The Semiconductor Boom

Global sales reach record heights

1 min read
semiconductor sales by month

In the most recent figures released by the World Semiconductor Trade Statistics organization, January 2014 was the best ever January on record, clocking in with sales figures hitting over US $26 billion worldwide. This follows the banner year of 2013, in which annual sales reached an all-time high of more than $305 billion. This marks a 35 percent increase over the depths of the post-recession slump in 2009, when global sales declined to $226.3 billion. “We expect the industry to maintain this momentum for the foreseeable future,” says Brian Toohey, president and CEO of the U.S. Semiconductor Industry Association.

Derived from: “The Semiconductor Boom”, IEEE Spectrum

Data source: WSTS

Infographic design: Brandon Palacio. Interactive: Josh Romero. Data source: World Semiconductor Trade Statistics
Keep Reading ↓Show less

This article is for IEEE members only. Join IEEE to access our full archive.

Join the world’s largest professional organization devoted to engineering and applied sciences and get access to all of Spectrum’s articles, podcasts, and special reports. Learn more →

If you're already an IEEE member, please sign in to continue reading.

Membership includes:

  • Get unlimited access to IEEE Spectrum content
  • Follow your favorite topics to create a personalized feed of IEEE Spectrum content
  • Save Spectrum articles to read later
  • Network with other technology professionals
  • Establish a professional profile
  • Create a group to share and collaborate on projects
  • Discover IEEE events and activities
  • Join and participate in discussions

The Ultimate Transistor Timeline

The transistor’s amazing evolution from point contacts to quantum tunnels

1 min read
A chart showing the timeline of when a transistor was invented and when it was commercialized.
LightGreen

Even as the initial sales receipts for the first transistors to hit the market were being tallied up in 1948, the next generation of transistors had already been invented (see “The First Transistor and How it Worked.”) Since then, engineers have reinvented the transistor over and over again, raiding condensed-matter physics for anything that might offer even the possibility of turning a small signal into a larger one.

Keep Reading ↓Show less