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The High-k Solution

Microprocessors coming out this fall are the result of the first big redesign in CMOS transistors since the late 1960s

17 min read
Intel engineering with a wafer of 45 nanometer microprocessors

From left: Ghani, Mistry, Chau, and Bohr of Intel with a wafer of 45 nanometer microprocessors

Photo: Aaron Hewitt

As you read this, two of our most advanced fabs here at Intel are gearing up for the commercial production of the latest Core 2 microprocessors, code-named Penryn, due to start rolling off the lines before the year is up. The chips, based on our latest 45-nanometer CMOS process technology will have more transistors and run faster and cooler than microprocessors fabricated with the previous, 65-nm process generation. For compute-intensive music, video, and gaming applications, users will see a hefty performance increase over the best chips they are now using.

A welcome development but hardly big news, right? After all, the density of transistors on chips has been periodically doubling, as predicted by Moore’s Law, for more than 40 years. The initial Penryn chips will be either dual-core processors with more than 400 million transistors or quad-core processors with more than 800 million transistors. You might think these chips don’t represent anything other than yet another checkpoint in the inexorable march of Moore’s Law.

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New EV Prototype Leaves Range Anxiety in the Dust

Mercedes-Benz's Vision EQXX completed a record-breaking 747-mile run in May

5 min read
a silver car driving down the road with a mountain of switchbacks behind it

The Mercedes-Benz Vision EQXX

Mercedes-Benz

Not long ago, a 300-mile range seemed like a healthy target for electric cars. More recently, the 520-mile (837-kilometer) Lucid Air became the world’s longest-range EV. But that record may not stand for long.

The Mercedes-Benz Vision EQXX, and its showroom-bound tech, looks to banish range anxiety for good: In April, the sleek prototype sedan completed a 621-mile (1,000-kilometer) trek through the Alps from Mercedes’ Sindelfingen facility to the Côte d'Azur in Cassis, France with battery juice to spare. It built on that feat in late May, when the prototype covered a world-beating, bladder-busting 747 miles (1,202 kilometers) in a run from Germany to the Formula One circuit in Silverstone, U.K.

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Artificial Synapses 10,000x Faster Than Real Thing

New protonic programmable resistors may help speed learning in deep neural networks

3 min read
Conceptual illustration shows a brain shape made of circuits on a multilayered chip structure.
Ella Maru Studio and Murat Onen

New artificial versions of the neurons and synapses in the human brain may be as small as one-thousandth the size of neurons and at least 10,000 times as fast as biological synapses, a study now finds.

These new devices may help improve the speed at which the increasingly common and powerful artificial-intelligence systems known as deep neural networks learn, researchers say.

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How New Storage Technologies Enhance HPC Systems

Different storage technologies can maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of HPC systems while providing high capacity and low latency storage, and minimizing network bandwidth and power consumption

1 min read
How New Storage Technologies Enhance HPC Systems

High-performance computing (HPC) has historically been available primarily to governments, research institutions, and a few very large corporations for modeling, simulation, and forecasting applications. As HPC platforms are being deployed in the cloud for shared services, high-performance computing is becoming much more accessible, and its use is benefiting organizations of all sizes. Increasing investment in the industrial internet of things (IIoT), artificial intelligence (AI), and electronic design automation (EDA) and silicon IP for engineering development are a few factors that are driving increased use of high-performance computing systems. In general, increasingly complex models for big data processing, simulation, and forecasting are driving a need for more compute power and greater storage capacity & performance.

This white paper highlights how different storage technologies can maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of HPC systems while providing high capacity and low latency storage, and minimizing network bandwidth and power consumption.