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The Cable Modem Traffic Jam

Tie-ups that slow broadband Internet access to a crawl are a reality--but solutions are near at hand

15 min read
The Cable Modem Traffic Jam

Broadband access to the Internet by cable modem promises users lightning-fast download speeds and an always-on connection. And recent converts to broadband from dial-up technology are thrilled with complex Web screens that download before their coffee gets cold.

But, these days, earlier converts to broadband are noticing something different. They are seeing their Internet access rates slow down, instead of speed up. They are sitting in a cable modem traffic jam. In fact, today, a 56K dial-up modem can at times be faster than a cable modem and access can be more reliable.

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Liquid Metal Stretchy Circuits, Built With Sound

Encase metallic droplets in plastic for elastic electronics

2 min read
Dark photograph of gloved hands holding an item that has the letters DMDL, with glowing yellow rectangles in an assortment of spots on the letters.

Liquid metal particles sheathed in polymers connect microLEDs to make an ultra-stretchable display.

Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

A team in Korea has used sound waves to connect tiny droplets of liquid metals inside a polymer casing. The novel technique is a way to make tough, highly conductive circuits that can be flexed and stretched to five times their original size.

Making stretchable electronics for skin-based sensors and implantable medical devices requires materials that can conduct electricity like metals but deform like rubber. Conventional metals don’t cut it for this use. To make elastic conductors, researchers have looked at conductive polymers and composites of metals and polymers. But these materials lose their conductivity after being stretched and released a few times.

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"SuperGPS" Accurate to 10 Centimeters or Better

New optical-wireless hybrid makes use of existing telecommunications infrastructure

3 min read
illustration of man looking at giant smart phone with map and red "you are here" symbol
iStock

Modern life now often depends on GPS(short for Global Positioning System), but it can err on the order of meters in cities. Now a new study from a team of Dutch researchers reveals a terrestrial positioning system based on existing telecommunications networks can deliver geolocation info accurate to within 10 centimeters in metropolitan areas.

The scientists detailed their findings 16 November in the journal Nature.

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Accelerate the Future of Innovation

Download these free whitepapers to learn more about emerging technologies like 5G, 6G, and quantum computing

1 min read
Keysight
Keysight

Looking for help with technical challenges related to emerging technologies like 5G, 6G, and quantum computing?

Download these three whitepapers to help inspire and accelerate your future innovations:

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