The Bike Helmet That Reads Your Brainwaves

EEG-enabled helmet lets bicyclists create "mind maps" of their routes

1 min read
The Bike Helmet That Reads Your Brainwaves
Photo: MindRider
Arlene Ducao invented the MindRider helmet for brainy bicyclists.

"This is your brain on bike," said Arlene Ducao at a recent talk in New York City, showing off a map of city streets studded with colorful dots. Ducao is the inventors of MindRider, the bike helmet that reads its riders' brainwaves. The helmet also correlates the bikers' mental state with their geographical routes, creating maps of what Ducao calls the city's "psychogeography."

Sound neat? The Kickstarter campaign launched today. 

Ducao came up with the helmet idea while a student at the MIT Media Lab, and is now hoping to make it a real product. The helmet has a commercially available EEG sensor embedded in its foam, which is supposed to register the rider's mental state on a continuum of relaxed to focused concentration. A small LED light on the helmet indicates that mental state in real time (from green for relaxed to red for intense attention), and the information is also sent to the MindRider app on the user's phone.  

With the app, users can examine maps of their bike routes and potentially determine which streets are stressing them out. In the Kickstarter video below, one rider says the information gives him "insight into where we need better bike lanes." 

It remains to be seen if bike riders are eager to analyze their on-the-go neural activity. But this clever piece of hardware is part of a trend enabled by newly cheap and available brain monitoring systems. It seems likely that quantified selfers will soon have many opportunities to track not just their steps and heart rates, but also their brain patterns. 

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This Implant Turns Brain Waves Into Words

A brain-computer interface deciphers commands intended for the vocal tract

10 min read
A man using an interface, looking at a screen with words on it.

A paralyzed man who hasn’t spoken in 15 years uses a brain-computer interface that decodes his intended speech, one word at a time.

University of California, San Francisco
Blue

A computer screen shows the question “Would you like some water?” Underneath, three dots blink, followed by words that appear, one at a time: “No I am not thirsty.”

It was brain activity that made those words materialize—the brain of a man who has not spoken for more than 15 years, ever since a stroke damaged the connection between his brain and the rest of his body, leaving him mostly paralyzed. He has used many other technologies to communicate; most recently, he used a pointer attached to his baseball cap to tap out words on a touchscreen, a method that was effective but slow. He volunteered for my research group’s clinical trial at the University of California, San Francisco in hopes of pioneering a faster method. So far, he has used the brain-to-text system only during research sessions, but he wants to help develop the technology into something that people like himself could use in their everyday lives.

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