Collision Risk While Driving a Truck and Texting 23 Times Higher Than When Not Texting

So Says Study By Virginia Tech Transportation Institute

1 min read
Collision Risk While Driving a Truck and Texting 23 Times Higher Than When Not Texting

In anotherarticle in the on-going New York Timesseries on the risks of using wireless devices while driving, a study by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI) indicates that text messaging while driving a truck makes the risk of a crash or near crash event 23.2 times higher than that when not texting.

According to VTTI press release, the study found that the risk of a crash or near crash event were the following:

Light Vehicle/Cars

  • Dialing Cell Phone - 2.8 times as high as non-distracted driving
  • Talking/Listening to Cell Phone - 1.3 times as high as non-distracted driving
  • Reaching for object (i.e. electronic device and other) - 1.4 times as high as non-distracted driving

Heavy Vehicles/Trucks

  • Dialing Cell phone - 5.9 times as high as non-distracted driving
  • Talking/Listening to Cell Phone - 1.0 times as high as non-distracted driving
  • Use/Reach for electronic device - 6.7 times as high as non-distracted driving
  • Text messaging - 23.2 times as high as non-distracted driving

VTTI says that it combined several large–scale, naturalistic driving studies (using sophisticated cameras and instrumentation in participants' personal vehicles) that provided a good understanding of driver distraction and cell phone use under real–world driving conditions. Combined, these studies continuously observed drivers for more than 6 million miles of driving.

The NY Times story also points out that while people understand texting while driving is dangerous, many do so anyway. It cites a AAA survey of 2,501 drivers this spring, of which 95 percent said that texting was unacceptable behavior, yet 21 percent of drivers said they also had recently texted or e-mailed while driving.

The Conversation (0)

An IBM Quantum Computer Will Soon Pass the 1,000-Qubit Mark

The Condor processor is just one quantum-computing advance slated for 2023

4 min read
This photo shows a woman working on a piece of apparatus that is suspended from the ceiling of the laboratory.

A researcher at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center examines some of the quantum hardware being constructed there.

Connie Zhou/IBM

IBM’s Condor, the world’s first universal quantum computer with more than 1,000 qubits, is set to debut in 2023. The year is also expected to see IBM launch Heron, the first of a new flock of modular quantum processors that the company says may help it produce quantum computers with more than 4,000 qubits by 2025.

This article is part of our special report Top Tech 2023.

While quantum computers can, in theory, quickly find answers to problems that classical computers would take eons to solve, today’s quantum hardware is still short on qubits, limiting its usefulness. Entanglement and other quantum states necessary for quantum computation are infamously fragile, being susceptible to heat and other disturbances, which makes scaling up the number of qubits a huge technical challenge.

Keep Reading ↓Show less