Join the NASA International Space Apps Challenges

Fifty contests mean there's an event for every technical bent

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Open source will meet outer space for 48 hours this weekend. Starting on 20 April, 75 cities around the world will host code-a-thons and hackfests, with participants working to solve space-related problems. Those who can’t make it to a physical event can participate in the 2013 International Space Apps Challenge online—alone or as a member of a virtual team.

There are over 50 challenges in all, grouped into the four categories: hardware, software, citizen science, and data visualization. Specific challenges include improving the design of the Arduino-based ArduSat microsatellite, creating a game based on establishing a sustainable lunar industry, developing a mission plan for putting a transponder on a near-Earth asteroid, and finding a new way to visualize the data still being returned from the Voyager I spacecraft.

The event is being organized by NASA in coordination with European, Japanese, French, and British space agencies, as well as other organizations and companies including the U.S. Department of Energy, Tumblr, and the Raspberry Pi Foundation.

Registration is required, especially if you wish to participate in person. All challenge solutions will be available under open source licenses, and prizes will be awarded for the best entries. Winners will be featured in an online gallery so that non-participants can check out the results when the event is completed.

Image: NASA

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