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TaxiBot Brings Autonomy to Aircraft Taxiing, Almost

Pretty soon, commercial pilots will no longer have to rely on humans to tug their jets back and forth from the runway

1 min read
TaxiBot Brings Autonomy to Aircraft Taxiing, Almost

 

This is TaxiBot. TaxiBot is big and strong and is capable of hauling the mighty Boeing 747 and the mightier Airbus A380 around airports, almost autonomously:

If you think about it, an airport is more or less the best possible place outside of a laboratory for an autonomous robotic vehicle to operate. It’s tightly controlled, without random people wandering around all over the place or suicidal bicyclists. It’s entirely flat. There are extremely well-defined areas in which vehicles can operate. Everything runs on a tight schedule (ideally). And as far as hauling airplanes around, there are huge freakin’ yellow lines painted on the ground that a robot can follow anywhere it needs to go.

It’s a little disappointing, then, that TaxiBot doesn’t actually incorporate much in the way of autonomy. It’s basically just a big remote control car that pilots can steer directly from the cockpit, and that’s driven around by a human when it’s not hauling aircraft. The point? The aircraft don’t have to use their engines while taxiing, reducing wear and saving fuel. So that’s good and all, I just kinda wish TaxiBot was, you know, a little less taxi and more a little bot. It’s something they’ve got in the works, though: the company says that the control architecture of the vehicle is already in place to support autonomous tug operation so that in the near future no tug driver would be needed for taxiing. Sweet, bring it on!

[ Ricardo TaxiBot ]

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The Bionic-Hand Arms Race

The prosthetics industry is too focused on high-tech limbs that are complicated, costly, and often impractical

12 min read
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A photograph of a young woman with brown eyes and neck length hair dyed rose gold sits at a white table. In one hand she holds a carbon fiber robotic arm and hand. Her other arm ends near her elbow. Her short sleeve shirt has a pattern on it of illustrated hands.

The author, Britt Young, holding her Ottobock bebionic bionic arm.

Gabriela Hasbun. Makeup: Maria Nguyen for MAC cosmetics; Hair: Joan Laqui for Living Proof
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In Jules Verne’s 1865 novel From the Earth to the Moon, members of the fictitious Baltimore Gun Club, all disabled Civil War veterans, restlessly search for a new enemy to conquer. They had spent the war innovating new, deadlier weaponry. By the war’s end, with “not quite one arm between four persons, and exactly two legs between six,” these self-taught amputee-weaponsmiths decide to repurpose their skills toward a new projectile: a rocket ship.

The story of the Baltimore Gun Club propelling themselves to the moon is about the extraordinary masculine power of the veteran, who doesn’t simply “overcome” his disability; he derives power and ambition from it. Their “crutches, wooden legs, artificial arms, steel hooks, caoutchouc [rubber] jaws, silver craniums [and] platinum noses” don’t play leading roles in their personalities—they are merely tools on their bodies. These piecemeal men are unlikely crusaders of invention with an even more unlikely mission. And yet who better to design the next great leap in technology than men remade by technology themselves?

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