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How to Stake Electronic Components Using Adhesives

Staking provides extra mechanical support for various electronic parts

2 min read
Adhesive staking of DIP component on a circuit board using Master Bond EP17HTDA-1.

The main use for adhesive staking is to provide extra mechanical support for electronic components and other parts that may be damaged due to vibration, shock, or handling.

Master Bond

This is a sponsored article brought to you by Master Bond.

Sensitive electronic components and other parts that may be damaged due to vibration, shock, or handling can often benefit from adhesive staking. Staking provides additional mechanical reinforcement to these delicate pieces.

Different components require different methods of staking. Dual inline packages (DIP) and capacitors, for example, will need distinctive staking approaches for the optimal outcome. For the DIP, the goal is to connect the corners of the component to the circuit board while ensuring that the material does not flow under the component.

To achieve this, use a fine tip syringe with a high viscosity compound and apply the adhesive to each the four corners. For a capacitor, there are several options. You can apply the adhesive to the edge of the component, stake at multiple locations, or even apply the material around the entire component.

Watch the video to see the staking methods.

Here, the objective is to attain enhanced stability while making a mechanical connection with the circuit board. After the material is applied, it must be cured according to the instructions on the technical data sheet.

To demonstrate these staking methods, Master Bond used one part epoxy system EP17HTDA-1. EP17HTDA-1 is a thermally conductive, electrically insulative material featuring a paste viscosity. It is a no mix system that cures in as little as one to two hours at 350° F, with minimal shrinkage. Its consistency is ideal for die attach applications.

EP17HTDA-1 specifications, including thermal, volume, viscosity, and cure specs

EP17HTDA-1 is a thermally conductive, electrically insulative material featuring a paste viscosity.

Master Bond

Other notable properties include high temperature resistance up to +600° F, excellent chemical resistance, NASA low outgassing, and MIL-STD-883J Section 3.5.2 for thermal stability.

Learn more about adhesive staking and how it can improve your applications.

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Two Startups Are Bringing Fiber to the Processor

Avicena’s blue microLEDs are the dark horse in a race with Ayar Labs’ laser-based system

5 min read
Diffuse blue light shines from a patterned surface through a ring. A blue cable leads away from it.

Avicena’s microLED chiplets could one day link all the CPUs in a computer cluster together.

Avicena

If a CPU in Seoul sends a byte of data to a processor in Prague, the information covers most of the distance as light, zipping along with no resistance. But put both those processors on the same motherboard, and they’ll need to communicate over energy-sapping copper, which slow the communication speeds possible within computers. Two Silicon Valley startups, Avicena and Ayar Labs, are doing something about that longstanding limit. If they succeed in their attempts to finally bring optical fiber all the way to the processor, it might not just accelerate computing—it might also remake it.

Both companies are developing fiber-connected chiplets, small chips meant to share a high-bandwidth connection with CPUs and other data-hungry silicon in a shared package. They are each ramping up production in 2023, though it may be a couple of years before we see a computer on the market with either product.

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