Squishy Power Generators

Deformable acrylics could turn human motion into electricity

3 min read
University of Auckland researchers built a self-priming dielectric elastomer generator into the heal of a sneaker.
Photo: Tom McKay

Photo: Tom McKay
A Shocking Shoe: University of Auckland researchers built a self-priming dielectric elastomer generator into the heal of a sneaker. Click on image to enlarge.

18 December 2012—Researchers have long been interested in capturing energy created by the mechanical motion of the human body and using it to power portable electronics, but the parts required for such a harvesting device tend to be bulky and stiff—not at all comfortable for humans.

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Greg Mably


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