Special Report: Dream Jobs 2011

If the words “true bliss” along with “job market” evoke snorts of derision, you need to meet these 10 odds-defying technologists. Learn how you, too, can become the envy of your peers

2 min read
Special Report: Dream Jobs 2011
Photo: Andreas Teichmann

Engineers, are you ready to shake things up? We know that the economy lately has been, well, unforgiving. But we still believe that you can—and should—find jobs you adore. This year, we met 10 engineers whose abrupt turns and occasional missteps led them to question their deepest desires, right the course, and find the jobs that are best for them. We quizzed hiring managers at top companies to learn what they seek. We also caught up with engineers we've featured in the past to see how dreams may change. Aim high, dear readers, and above all, have fun.

Dream Jobs 2011 list of articles

Bessone

Loredana Bessone
At the European Space Agency, Loredana Bessone prepares explorers for the rigors of space

langer

Ricky Langer
Ricky Langer has landed in the envy-inducing vortex of his passions: ESPN's tech team

lott

Gus Lott
Gus Lott designs virtual reality systems for bugs and rats so that we can study their brains—and ours

walker

John Q. Walker
John Q. Walker brings back the sounds of musical greats

kare

Jordin Kare
LaserMotive's Jordin Kare aims to propel rockets and helicopters with light

kare

Lucie Pautet
As the lead engineer for NEPTUNE Canada, Lucie Pautet manages a seafloor sensor network

Huang

Hsin-Chien Huang
How an engineer became one of Taiwan's best-known artists

Duiser

Jaap Duiser
Jaap Duiser is the engineer behind 2getthere's personal rapid transit system in Masdar, the Middle East's budding eco-city

abo-shaeer

Amir Abo-Shaeer
Aided by robots, Amir Abo-Shaeer cultivates the next generation's engineers

mark sagar

Mark Sagar
Academy Award-winner Mark Sagar makes virtual visages that smile, scowl, and shimmer

help wanted

Help Wanted
What technology recruiters are looking for

where are they now

Where Are They Now?
Four technologists check in
The Conversation (0)

Q&A With Co-Creator of the 6502 Processor

Bill Mensch on the microprocessor that powered the Atari 2600 and Commodore 64

5 min read
Bill Mensch

Few people have seen their handiwork influence the world more than Bill Mensch. He helped create the legendary 8-bit 6502 microprocessor, launched in 1975, which was the heart of groundbreaking systems including the Atari 2600, Apple II, and Commodore 64. Mensch also created the VIA 65C22 input/output chip—noted for its rich features and which was crucial to the 6502's overall popularity—and the second-generation 65C816, a 16-bit processor that powered machines such as the Apple IIGS, and the Super Nintendo console.

Many of the 65x series of chips are still in production. The processors and their variants are used as microcontrollers in commercial products, and they remain popular among hobbyists who build home-brewed computers. The surge of interest in retrocomputing has led to folks once again swapping tips on how to write polished games using the 6502 assembly code, with new titles being released for the Atari, BBC Micro, and other machines.

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Spot’s 3.0 Update Adds Increased Autonomy, New Door Tricks

Boston Dynamics' Spot can now handle push-bar doors and dynamically replan in complex environments

5 min read
Boston Dynamics

While Boston Dynamics' Atlas humanoid spends its time learning how to dance and do parkour, the company's Spot quadruped is quietly getting much better at doing useful, valuable tasks in commercial environments. Solving tasks like dynamic path planning and door manipulation in a way that's robust enough that someone can buy your robot and not regret it is, I would argue, just as difficult (if not more difficult) as getting a robot to do a backflip.

With a short blog post today, Boston Dynamics is announcing Spot Release 3.0, representing more than a year of software improvements over Release 2.0 that we covered back in May of 2020. The highlights of Release 3.0 include autonomous dynamic replanning, cloud integration, some clever camera tricks, and a new ability to handle push-bar doors, and earlier today, we spoke with Spot Chief Engineer at Boston Dynamics Zachary Jackowski to learn more about what Spot's been up to.

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McMaster Engineering: Transforming Education and Fostering Research With Impact

By adding new faculty and developing innovative approaches to its curriculum, McMaster solidifies its world leading position in engineering

3 min read

The Faculty of Engineering at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont., Canada is aiming to build on its ranking as one of the world's top engineering schools by expanding its recruitment of both tenure-track and teaching track positions across multiple departments. This broad initiative is expected to continue the growth of McMaster as a leading destination for innovative teaching and research.

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