Smithsonian Snaps Up Nine Historic Robots from Sandia National Labs

The Smithsonian’s permanent collection now includes tiny robots, robots that jump, and an autonomous robot from 1985, all courtesy Sandia Labs

1 min read
Smithsonian Snaps Up Nine Historic Robots from Sandia National Labs

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While thinking about robotics as a still-emerging field, as we do, we don’t often stop to consider how even the relatively recent past has a significant historical relevance. Fortunately, this is the job of the Smithsonian Institution, and they seem to be very proactive about it, having just acquired nine robots from Sandia National Labs for their permanent collection.

The robots in the above picture include MARV (Miniature Autonomous Robotic Vehicle), a design from 1996 that used mostly commercial parts and measured only about one inch square [about 6.5 square centimeters]. MARV was one of the first robots to really tackle miniaturization head on, and it inspired all kinds of tiny little descendants, including Sandia’s own dime-sized tank.

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Also heading to the Smithsonian are SIR, a robot that could navigate through a building autonomously in 1985 (on the left), Dixie, a reconnaissance robot from 1987 (at the back), and some of those crazy hopping robots.

It’s fun to think about what robots that we have around us right now are likely to find a place in the Smithsonian’s collection within a decade or two... After five seconds of thought (which means I’m missing all kinds of slightly less obviously but equally worthy choices), I’d have to put my money on a Roomba, PR2, Keepon, a Predator, and Wall-E. What do you think?

Via [ Sandia ]

The Conversation (0)

How Robots Can Help Us Act and Feel Younger

Toyota’s Gill Pratt on enhancing independence in old age

10 min read
An illustration of a woman making a salad with robotic arms around her holding vegetables and other salad ingredients.
Dan Page
Blue

By 2050, the global population aged 65 or more will be nearly double what it is today. The number of people over the age of 80 will triple, approaching half a billion. Supporting an aging population is a worldwide concern, but this demographic shift is especially pronounced in Japan, where more than a third of Japanese will be 65 or older by midcentury.

Toyota Research Institute (TRI), which was established by Toyota Motor Corp. in 2015 to explore autonomous cars, robotics, and “human amplification technologies,” has also been focusing a significant portion of its research on ways to help older people maintain their health, happiness, and independence as long as possible. While an important goal in itself, improving self-sufficiency for the elderly also reduces the amount of support they need from society more broadly. And without technological help, sustaining this population in an effective and dignified manner will grow increasingly difficult—first in Japan, but globally soon after.

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