The December 2022 issue of IEEE Spectrum is here!

Close bar

Senegalese-American Chart-topper Akon Looks to Light Up Africa

The wildly popular singer Akon is establishing an academy to teach Africans how to build and maintain grid-free power networks

1 min read
Senegalese-American Chart-topper Akon Looks to Light Up Africa
Photo: Denis Van Tine/AP Photo

Senegalese-American musician and record producer Akon is well known for lighting up the stage and the music charts. But now he’s set his sights on a more important mission than delighting music fans: supplying electricity to 600 million Africans who currently lack access to the grid. He has started an initiative called Akon Lighting Africa. Its first project is the launch of a Solar Academy in Bamako, Mali. The faculty at the academy, which is scheduled to open this summer, will help African engineers and entrepreneurs develop skills that will enable them to produce solar-powered microgrids and make it easier to acquire the necessary equipment.

Africa has the lowest percentage of inhabitants with access to national grids, but has the benefit of 320 days of sun each year on average. Harnessing that solar energy will not only allow Africans to use electronic gadgets, but also create a new category of tech jobs that could boost the standard of living across the continent. “We expect the Africans who graduate from this center to devise new, innovative, technical solutions,” Thione Niang, one of Akon Lighting Africa’s cofounders, told Reuters. “With this academy, we can capitalize on Akon Lighting Africa and go further.”

The group announced the launch of the academy late last month at the second United NationsSustainable Energy for All Forum, in New York City.

The Conversation (0)
This photograph shows a car with the words “We Drive Solar” on the door, connected to a charging station. A windmill can be seen in the background.

The Dutch city of Utrecht is embracing vehicle-to-grid technology, an example of which is shown here—an EV connected to a bidirectional charger. The historic Rijn en Zon windmill provides a fitting background for this scene.

We Drive Solar

Hundreds of charging stations for electric vehicles dot Utrecht’s urban landscape in the Netherlands like little electric mushrooms. Unlike those you may have grown accustomed to seeing, many of these stations don’t just charge electric cars—they can also send power from vehicle batteries to the local utility grid for use by homes and businesses.

Debates over the feasibility and value of such vehicle-to-grid technology go back decades. Those arguments are not yet settled. But big automakers like Volkswagen, Nissan, and Hyundai have moved to produce the kinds of cars that can use such bidirectional chargers—alongside similar vehicle-to-home technology, whereby your car can power your house, say, during a blackout, as promoted by Ford with its new F-150 Lightning. Given the rapid uptake of electric vehicles, many people are thinking hard about how to make the best use of all that rolling battery power.

Keep Reading ↓Show less