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Samsung’s Plasma Displays Barred From Japanese Market

Fujitsu and Samsung will slug it out in court

3 min read
In the three-electrode, surface-discharge reflection structure covered by Fujitsu’s Patent No. 2845183, address electrodes run under and parallel with alternating red, green, and blue phosphor channels.
Fujitsu 183: In the three-electrode, surface-discharge reflection structure covered by Fujitsu’s Patent No. 2845183, address electrodes run under and parallel with alternating red, green, and blue phosphor channels, while pairs of transparent display discharge-sustain electrodes embedded in a transparent front substrate run at right angles across the channels. A voltage is applied to pairs of selected display electrodes on the grid, prompting gas to discharge and emit ultraviolet light, which causes the phosphor to emit visible light.
Illustration: Bryan Christie; Source: Fujitsu

With global sales of large television sets soaring, competition among manufacturers of the largest TV screens—plasma display panels (PDPs)—is moving beyond the marketplace and into the courthouse and customs office. On 21 April, Japan’s customs authorities imposed a temporary import ban on PDPs manufactured by South Korea’s Samsung SDI Co., the display manufacturing unit of the country’s leading electronics company. The action came after Fujitsu Ltd., Japan’s top computer and communications firm, had sought an administrative injunction against the products, alleging that Samsung was infringing on its patents.

The following day, Samsung filed a lawsuit in Tokyo District Court seeking to nullify Fujitsu’s claims and requested that Japan’s Patent Office do the same. Mean-while, in Seoul, Lee Hee-beom, South Korea’s Commerce, Industry, and Energy Minister, summoned the Japanese ambassador to a meeting and demanded that Japan’s customs authorities halt their “unilateral” action.

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Digging Into the New QD-OLED TVs

Formerly rival technologies have come together in Samsung displays

5 min read
Television screen displaying closeup of crystals

Sony's A95K televisions incorporate Samsung's new QD-OLED display technology.

Sony
Blue
Televisions and computer monitors with QD-OLED displays are now on store shelves. The image quality is—as expected—impressive, with amazing black levels, wide viewing angles, a broad color gamut, and high brightness. The products include:

All these products use display panels manufactured by Samsung but have their own unique display assembly, operating system, and electronics.

I took apart a 55-inch Samsung S95B to learn just how these new displays are put together (destroying it in the process). I found an extremely thin OLED backplane that generates blue light with an equally thin QD color-converting structure that completes the optical stack. I used a UV light source, a microscope, and a spectrometer to learn a lot about how these displays work.

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