Russia's Nanotechnology Initiative Goes on a Spending Spree

Rusnano's deals are becoming numerous. Is a pattern starting to form?

1 min read
Russia's Nanotechnology Initiative Goes on a Spending Spree

I have been fascinated by the Russian government’s foray into nanotechnology; it contains intrigue,  hidden complexities, and more than its share of skepticism.

The list of skeptics even extends to the country's political leaders

"[Rusnano] is the kind of instrument that sometimes works and sometimes doesn't work at all," President Dmitry Medvedev said two years ago, calling the company a "large structure that has a lot of money and that still has to understand how to correctly spend it."

Well, it seems that Rusnano has overcome that learning curve and is spending…a lot. Over at TNT Log this week there is a pretty thorough recap of the deals that Rusnano has been involved in to date.

But so fast and furious is the action at this point that there are already new deals here at the end of the week to add to the list. For instance, Rusnano and Toyota Tsusho have signed a memorandum of cooperation in the fields of electronics, organic chemistry, the environment, and automobile manufacturing.

A fair share of the announced deals really only involve MOUs, and the world of business is littered with MOUs that never actually turn into contracts. Nonetheless, is a picture developing from the deals we have seen thus far? 

It’s hard to say for sure, but at least TNT Log characterizes them as being on the riskier side of the investment scale. And well should they be, in my estimation. If you’re going after market segments that will be affected by the enabling technology of nanotech, then you're likely to find yourself in some pretty risky investments.

The Conversation (0)

Two Startups Are Bringing Fiber to the Processor

Avicena’s blue microLEDs are the dark horse in a race with Ayar Labs’ laser-based system

5 min read
Diffuse blue light shines from a patterned surface through a ring. A blue cable leads away from it.

Avicena’s microLED chiplets could one day link all the CPUs in a computer cluster together.

Avicena

If a CPU in Seoul sends a byte of data to a processor in Prague, the information covers most of the distance as light, zipping along with no resistance. But put both those processors on the same motherboard, and they’ll need to communicate over energy-sapping copper, which slow the communication speeds possible within computers. Two Silicon Valley startups, Avicena and Ayar Labs, are doing something about that longstanding limit. If they succeed in their attempts to finally bring optical fiber all the way to the processor, it might not just accelerate computing—it might also remake it.

Both companies are developing fiber-connected chiplets, small chips meant to share a high-bandwidth connection with CPUs and other data-hungry silicon in a shared package. They are each ramping up production in 2023, though it may be a couple of years before we see a computer on the market with either product.

Keep Reading ↓Show less