It's been more than 2 years since we last reported on Massachusetts startup Harvest Automation. Now Joe Jones, Harvest's co-founder and CTO, has given an interview to the Robots Podcast to let us know what they've been up to.

Harvest is not your typical robotics start up. For a start, the experience of the founding and management team is unusual for any start up, and truly exceptional in the very young industry of autonomous robotics. Joe Jones alone has more than 24 years of robotics experience. As the first employee of iRobot, he invented the Roomba vacuum cleaning robot, which to date has sold in more than 3 million units, and next to numerous research articles, Jones has also authored three books on robotics, and holds 15 patents. Also, unlike most start ups, the Harvest team had no particular product or application in mind when they first got together in 2007 under the initial name Q-Robotics. Instead, they went on an extended fact-finding mission about possible markets for a robot "one step beyond the Roomba".

What they've come up with is surprising. Agriculture may not seem like the easiest way to start: it's an outdoor application which means dealing with rain, mud, and temperature variations, environments are typically very unstructured, your typical user is unlikely to be highly skilled in software or automation, and tasks are normally accomplished using big machinery - all very different from the Roomba. However, Harvest has found a niche application which eliminates at least two of these challenges and which - they hope - can act as a stepping stone.

Harvest is targeting wholesale shrub farms as the one in the image above, which can have as many as 3 million containers of ornamental plants in 500 acres. Their robots lift and move the plants to perform tasks like spacing potted plants in grids - an operation that has to be repeated as plants grow, to efficiently use space at first, and then again to avoid that they grow into each other. The current human workers will essentially serve as supervisors to Harvest’s robots - they still give direction at a high level, but the machines are doing the heavy lifting. First trials have proven very successful, and the team is now working on a production version.

The Robots podcast interview with Joe Jones gives a deep insight into what it takes to bridge the gap between academia and industry. Jones explains more about the how's and why's of Harvest Automation, why moving potted plants is the next logical step after the Roomba and how they plan to tap into a potentially huge market for autonomous robots.

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The Bionic-Hand Arms Race

The prosthetics industry is too focused on high-tech limbs that are complicated, costly, and often impractical

12 min read
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A photograph of a young woman with brown eyes and neck length hair dyed rose gold sits at a white table. In one hand she holds a carbon fiber robotic arm and hand. Her other arm ends near her elbow. Her short sleeve shirt has a pattern on it of illustrated hands.

The author, Britt Young, holding her Ottobock bebionic bionic arm.

Gabriela Hasbun. Makeup: Maria Nguyen for MAC cosmetics; Hair: Joan Laqui for Living Proof
DarkGray

In Jules Verne’s 1865 novel From the Earth to the Moon, members of the fictitious Baltimore Gun Club, all disabled Civil War veterans, restlessly search for a new enemy to conquer. They had spent the war innovating new, deadlier weaponry. By the war’s end, with “not quite one arm between four persons, and exactly two legs between six,” these self-taught amputee-weaponsmiths decide to repurpose their skills toward a new projectile: a rocket ship.

The story of the Baltimore Gun Club propelling themselves to the moon is about the extraordinary masculine power of the veteran, who doesn’t simply “overcome” his disability; he derives power and ambition from it. Their “crutches, wooden legs, artificial arms, steel hooks, caoutchouc [rubber] jaws, silver craniums [and] platinum noses” don’t play leading roles in their personalities—they are merely tools on their bodies. These piecemeal men are unlikely crusaders of invention with an even more unlikely mission. And yet who better to design the next great leap in technology than men remade by technology themselves?

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