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Robots Play Soccer, Make Cereal at RoboCup German Open

It's nonstop action and adventure at the RoboCup German Open 2011, from diving soccer saves to artificial-hand-delivered orange juice

1 min read

The RoboCup German Open 2011 wrapped up last weekend, and we've got a couple video highlights to share from the event.

This first clip is from the RoboCup@Home competition, which aims to develop service and assistive robot technology that will eventually make its way into your home. Here, Dynamaid and Cosero, two robots from Team NimbRo at the University of Bonn, team up to autonomously to make breakfast (of a sort):

RoboCup is perhaps best know for soccer, and the Darmstadt Dribblers (we've been big fans foryears) took first place in the Kidsize soccer competition, defending their 2010 title. The 3v3 fully autonomous matches feature thrills, spills, violence, dives, and unprecedented speed and skill... Those robots are as good or better at aiming for the corners than most humans I know. In the first half of the match, stick around until the very end to see some tricky ball-handling skills:

And in the second half, check out one of the bots go from left footed to right footed and score, and make sure to hang on until minute nine to witness the first ever successful goalkeeper save and throw in a regulation robot soccer match:

Remember, the goal of RoboCup is to field a team of human robots capable of defeating a world-class team of humans at full field soccer. Obviously, we're not there yet, but the magnitude of improvements that we've seen over just the last two or three years has me convinced that the 2050 target is, if anything, pessimistic.

[ RoboCup German Open ]

[ Team NimbRo ]

[ Darmstadt Dribblers ]

The Conversation (0)

How Robots Can Help Us Act and Feel Younger

Toyota’s Gill Pratt on enhancing independence in old age

10 min read
An illustration of a woman making a salad with robotic arms around her holding vegetables and other salad ingredients.
Dan Page
Blue

By 2050, the global population aged 65 or more will be nearly double what it is today. The number of people over the age of 80 will triple, approaching half a billion. Supporting an aging population is a worldwide concern, but this demographic shift is especially pronounced in Japan, where more than a third of Japanese will be 65 or older by midcentury.

Toyota Research Institute (TRI), which was established by Toyota Motor Corp. in 2015 to explore autonomous cars, robotics, and “human amplification technologies,” has also been focusing a significant portion of its research on ways to help older people maintain their health, happiness, and independence as long as possible. While an important goal in itself, improving self-sufficiency for the elderly also reduces the amount of support they need from society more broadly. And without technological help, sustaining this population in an effective and dignified manner will grow increasingly difficult—first in Japan, but globally soon after.

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