Roboticist Danica Kragic holding a Nao robot in front of a white board with equations on it.
Photo: Mika Nitz Pettersson

THE INSTITUTEInstead of featuring supermodels and celebrities to showcase her 2016 clothing line, Swedish fashion designer Carin Rodebjer chose women she considers to be doing extraordinary work for her “I Am” video campaign, which ran last year on Vogue online. One of those profiled was IEEE Fellow Danica Kragic.

Kragic is vice dean of the School of Computer Science and Communication at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, in Stockholm. As director of the university’s Centre for Autonomous Systems, she’s developing vision for robots, as well as object-grasping and -manipulating systems, to give them motor skills that make them more like humans.

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The State of the Transistor in 3 Charts

In 75 years, it’s become tiny, mighty, ubiquitous, and just plain weird

3 min read
A photo of 3 different transistors.
iStockphoto
LightGreen

The most obvious change in transistor technology in the last 75 years has been just how many we can make. Reducing the size of the device has been a titanic effort and a fantastically successful one, as these charts show. But size isn’t the only feature engineers have been improving.

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