Robot Puts Box On Head

iCub explores head-box interactions

1 min read
Robot Puts Box On Head

Robots have a tendency to move rather a lot like, um, robots. How dare they. The smooth and natural motions that we humans are so proud of comes from a combination of many different motions all at once: if you pick something up, you're generally not just using your arm like a robot does, but rather, subtly moving your arms, wrists, hands, torso, and even your head. With a new movement algorithm, iCub is learning to move in a much more human-like manner, even with complex motions.

Yes, at least, iCub has learned how to put things on its head. Brilliant.

You may have noticed that the beginning of the video that it was the recipient of the AAAI 2013 Shakey Award for Best Student Video. What's a Shakey? Why, I'm glad you asked! Meet Shakey, who was pioneering task-planning and route-finding at the Stanford Research Institute back in the 1960s:

Shakey is now retired, but you can find him chillin' at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif.

[ IM CLEVER ]

The Conversation (0)

How Robots Can Help Us Act and Feel Younger

Toyota’s Gill Pratt on enhancing independence in old age

10 min read
An illustration of a woman making a salad with robotic arms around her holding vegetables and other salad ingredients.
Dan Page
Blue

By 2050, the global population aged 65 or more will be nearly double what it is today. The number of people over the age of 80 will triple, approaching half a billion. Supporting an aging population is a worldwide concern, but this demographic shift is especially pronounced in Japan, where more than a third of Japanese will be 65 or older by midcentury.

Toyota Research Institute (TRI), which was established by Toyota Motor Corp. in 2015 to explore autonomous cars, robotics, and “human amplification technologies,” has also been focusing a significant portion of its research on ways to help older people maintain their health, happiness, and independence as long as possible. While an important goal in itself, improving self-sufficiency for the elderly also reduces the amount of support they need from society more broadly. And without technological help, sustaining this population in an effective and dignified manner will grow increasingly difficult—first in Japan, but globally soon after.

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