Hamamatsu Corporation has introduced a new distance image sensor, the S12973-01CT. It is capable of real-time distance measurement, and can be used for applications such as obstacle detection by autonomous cars and robots, shape recognition by robots, intrusion detection, and motion capture.

New distance image sensor for Hammatsu


The S12973-01CT has a linear array of 64 pixels with a pixel pitch of 22 µm and pixel height of 50 µm. It has peak wavelength sensitivity at 800 nm. This device measures the distance to an object by a time-of-flight (TOF) method. When used in combination with a pulse modulated light source, the S12973-01CT outputs phase difference information based on the timing of the light emission and when the light is received. The sensor’s output signals are then arithmetically processed by an external signal processing circuit or a PC to obtain distance data.

For more information about S12973-01CT distance image sensor, including pricing and delivery time, please call Hamamatsu Corporation at 1-800-524-0504 or visit the company’s website, http://www.hamamatsu.com.

About Hamamatsu Corporation 

Hamamatsu Corporation is the North American subsidiary of Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. (Japan), a leading manufacturer of devices for the generation and measurement of infrared, visible, and ultraviolet light. These devices include photodiodes, silicon photomultipliers, photomultiplier tubes, scientific light sources, infrared detectors, and image sensors. The parent company is dedicated to the advancement of photonics through extensive research. This corporate philosophy results in state-of-the-art products which are used throughout the world in scientific, industrial, and commercial applications.  

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