The December 2022 issue of IEEE Spectrum is here!

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As the variety and complexity of communication systems in the modern RF battlefield increase, the need to quickly design, deploy and field upgrade spectrum monitoring and direction finding solutions becomes paramount. Software Defined Radio (SDR) platforms for these applications need to cover wide frequency ranges, process high bandwidth data in real-time, provide synchronization scalable across multiple channels, and support flexible development tools.  

SDRs with user programmable FPGAs are uniquely positioned to keep pace with the rapidly changing ecosystem of algorithms and technologies to effectively carry out SIGINT, EW and multi-mission operations.

Join National Instruments (NI) for an in-depth discussion of the next generation of flexible and powerful COTS SDRs that enable direction finding, spectrum monitoring and radio functionality.  This webinar includes discussion of key RF system requirements, an overview of multiple software tool flows, and a demonstration of a reference direction finding application.

Watch as we highlight how communication systems in the modern RF battlefield increase the need to quickly design, deploy and field upgradable spectrum monitoring and direction-finding solutions.  With a focus on SIGINT and electronic warfare we discuss the need for wide frequency ranges, ability to process high bandwidth data in real-time, synchronization scalable across multiple channels, and support flexible development tools.

Watch the webcast now!

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Why the Internet Needs the InterPlanetary File System

Peer-to-peer file sharing would make the Internet far more efficient

12 min read
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Carl De Torres
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When the COVID-19 pandemic erupted in early 2020, the world made an unprecedented shift to remote work. As a precaution, some Internet providers scaled back service levels temporarily, although that probably wasn’t necessary for countries in Asia, Europe, and North America, which were generally able to cope with the surge in demand caused by people teleworking (and binge-watching Netflix). That’s because most of their networks were overprovisioned, with more capacity than they usually need. But in countries without the same level of investment in network infrastructure, the picture was less rosy: Internet service providers (ISPs) in South Africa and Venezuela, for instance, reported significant strain.

But is overprovisioning the only way to ensure resilience? We don’t think so. To understand the alternative approach we’re championing, though, you first need to recall how the Internet works.

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