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rezero ballbot

A few weeks ago we reported on a ball-balancing robot by Masaaki Kumagai at Tohoku Gakuin University in Japan. Interestingly, the same challenge has been taken up by a team of students at the ETH Zurich in Switzerland, who have just presented their Rezero robot to the public.

The Focus-Project team Ballbot consists of eight future mechanical engineers, studying at the ETH Zurich, two electrical engineers studying at the ZHAW as well as the Industrial Designers educated at ZHdK. Through the combination of our skills and ideas we aim to complete an unprecedented project which develops a new concept of movement. Our team with its task is supervised by Prof. Dr. Roland Siegwart, Director of the ASL at ETH Zurich

Watch:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/v/sB9IowB8nx8&rel=0&color1=0xb1b1b1&color2=0xd0d0d0&hl=de_DE&feature=player_embedded&fs=1 expand=1]

Unlike Kumagai's ballbot, one focus of the Rezero is design:

Rezero is meant to entertain and impress. It is supposed to create emotions. It will be able to interact with a small group of people, react on attractions and in doing so create a hands-on experience with the Ballbot technology. The Ballbot will be an ambassador of its own movement skills. Its dynamic hull even allows Rezero to show and create emotions. Imagine Rezero breathing, being curious or frightened. And even waking up or going to sleep by revealing or retracting its sphere.

Another focus is improved dynamics: To push the boundaries of current ballbots, the team uses a custom-made motor controller in combination with high-performance engines and a specially coated ball. This allows Rezero to move fast - at speeds up to 3.5m/s and with inclinations up to 17 degrees - and to perform unique movements, such as moving with high inclinations while simultaneously rotating around its vertical axis.

The Rezero project is supported by Disney, which just opened their Disney Research lab at ETH Zurich earlier this year -- only the second joint lab with a university (the other is Disney Research in Pittsburgh with CMU).

Another video and more images, including artist renderings of envisioned applications:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/v/Yl5xP18bHqs&rel=0&color1=0xb1b1b1&color2=0xd0d0d0&hl=de_DE&feature=player_embedded&fs=1 expand=1]

rezero robot ballbot

 

Read also:

A Robot That Balances on a Ball
Thu, April 29, 2010

Blog Post: Masaaki Kumagai has built wheeled robots, crawling robots, and legged robots. Now he's built a robot that rides on a ball

Riding Honda's U3-X Unicycle of the Future
Mon, April 12, 2010

Blog Post: It only has one wheel, but Honda's futuristic personal mobility device is no pedal-pusher

Personal Mobility Robot Operated by Wii-mote
Thu, April 22, 2010

Blog Post: Japanese researchers demonstrate a robotic wheelchair operated with Wii game controller

The Conversation (0)

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A photograph of a young woman with brown eyes and neck length hair dyed rose gold sits at a white table. In one hand she holds a carbon fiber robotic arm and hand. Her other arm ends near her elbow. Her short sleeve shirt has a pattern on it of illustrated hands.

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Gabriela Hasbun. Makeup: Maria Nguyen for MAC cosmetics; Hair: Joan Laqui for Living Proof
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In Jules Verne’s 1865 novel From the Earth to the Moon, members of the fictitious Baltimore Gun Club, all disabled Civil War veterans, restlessly search for a new enemy to conquer. They had spent the war innovating new, deadlier weaponry. By the war’s end, with “not quite one arm between four persons, and exactly two legs between six,” these self-taught amputee-weaponsmiths decide to repurpose their skills toward a new projectile: a rocket ship.

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