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Robots Make Bavarian Breakfast Together

James and Rosie met each other at a robotics lab in Munich. They are now inseparable

2 min read
Robots Make Bavarian Breakfast Together

TUM Rosie robot preparing breakfast

Once upon a time, a charming American robot called James met a striking German bot by the name of Rosie. They liked each other, so they moved in together. Now they spend their days taking long walks in the lab and doing other things that robots do.

James is a PR2 robot, built by U.S. robotics firm Willow Garage, and it traveled to Germany as part of the PR2 Beta Program, an effort to popularize personal robots. At the Technical University Munich (TUM), James was introduced to Rosie, a dual-arm robot with a curvy figure and four eyes [photo above].

Their courtship was at first a bit mechanical, but they soon found many things in common: Both run ROS (Robot Operating System), use Hokuyo laser scanners and Kinect 3D sensors, and have omnidirectional mobile bases.

On a recent spring morning, James and Rosie were seen together cooking the traditional Weisswurst Frühstück, a Bavarian sausage breakfast.

A typical Bavarian Sausage Breakfast

It was a demonstration prepared by researchers at CoTeSys (Cognition for Technical Systems), a Munich-based high-tech cluster. This is how the researchers summarize the experiment:

TUM-Rosie is collecting the sausages, putting them into the pot with boiling water, waiting for them to be cooked and, finally, finding and getting them out of the pot into the serving bowl. [The PR2 robot] TUM-James is meanwhile slicing the french baguette using a regular electric bread slicer and in the end serving the sausages and the bread to the class of highly regarded roboticists. [...]

TUM-James makes use of recent advances in the field of real-time RGB-D sensing using a Kinect sensor for the detection of the bread slicer and the baguette. In the serving task it uses PR2’s haptic capabilities in order to grasp and manipulate the plate.

TUM-Rosie is also using Kinect and perception algorithms from COP [cognitive perception] module in order to calibrate the skimmer and use it as a new tool center point of the arm. Furthermore it learns the 3D models for the pot and the bowls in order to be able to localize them at any arbitrary pose on the table. Lastly, it uses the torque sensors to resolve depth measurement inaccuracies through contact detection with the objects and blob segmentation in order to localize sausages inside the pot.

The couple has a promising life ahead of them, and we look forward to hearing about their future adventures and, hopefully, seeing some baby robots too.

PS: This is not the first romantic meal the robots have together. Last year, the pair prepared a somewhat more mainstream breakfast: pancakes. Guten Appetit!

Thanks, Dejan!

The Conversation (0)

The Bionic-Hand Arms Race

The prosthetics industry is too focused on high-tech limbs that are complicated, costly, and often impractical

12 min read
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A photograph of a young woman with brown eyes and neck length hair dyed rose gold sits at a white table. In one hand she holds a carbon fiber robotic arm and hand. Her other arm ends near her elbow. Her short sleeve shirt has a pattern on it of illustrated hands.

The author, Britt Young, holding her Ottobock bebionic bionic arm.

Gabriela Hasbun. Makeup: Maria Nguyen for MAC cosmetics; Hair: Joan Laqui for Living Proof
DarkGray

In Jules Verne’s 1865 novel From the Earth to the Moon, members of the fictitious Baltimore Gun Club, all disabled Civil War veterans, restlessly search for a new enemy to conquer. They had spent the war innovating new, deadlier weaponry. By the war’s end, with “not quite one arm between four persons, and exactly two legs between six,” these self-taught amputee-weaponsmiths decide to repurpose their skills toward a new projectile: a rocket ship.

The story of the Baltimore Gun Club propelling themselves to the moon is about the extraordinary masculine power of the veteran, who doesn’t simply “overcome” his disability; he derives power and ambition from it. Their “crutches, wooden legs, artificial arms, steel hooks, caoutchouc [rubber] jaws, silver craniums [and] platinum noses” don’t play leading roles in their personalities—they are merely tools on their bodies. These piecemeal men are unlikely crusaders of invention with an even more unlikely mission. And yet who better to design the next great leap in technology than men remade by technology themselves?

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