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Parrot Unveils a Hydrofoil Drone

The French company takes to the water for the first time as it shows off upgrades to its line of mini-drones

2 min read
A cameraman-style boat floats in the water, with a quadcopter drone on top.
Photo: Kristen Clark

Parrot, a leader in consumer drone tech, came to a New York City hotel last week to show off it’s latest products. Most of what was on offer were upgrades to Parrot’s existing rolling and flying drones, such as the Jumping Race drone that has widened wheels and can reach almost 13 kilometers per hour and jump over 75 centimeters through the air. A nice addition on the flying side is the Airborne Cargo, which has a small patch on top that allows owners to attach what are officially referred to as “toy bricks” by Parrot (read “Lego blocks”) and enhance their drone with their own creations. 

But the big draw was the drone zigzagging back and forth in a rooftop pool, and not just because it was a melting-the-tarmac-hot day in New York. This was the Hydrofoil, which as its name indicates, is a boat fitted with plastic hydrofoils projecting beneath its foam hull. As the boat increases its speed, eventually enough lift is generated from water passing over the hydrofoils to lift the hull out of the water. The result is a dramatic reduction in the drag that must be overcome when a hull normally cuts through water, producing  a corresponding jump in the speed of the boat (and the drone’s battery life). The Hydrofoil can reach over 9.5 km/h, and, based on my repeated collisions with the narrow walls of this particular pool, is pretty robust.

Cleverly, Parrot did not create a dedicated hydrofoil design: instead the hull is equipped with a cradle into which a flying minidrone can be fitted (the minidrone can be flown completely independently). When the drone is powered up, the cradle flips the drone through 90 degrees, turning the normally vertical lift from its propellers into horizontal motion. The smartphone app used to control the drone handles the switch from the control model used to fly the plane through the air in three dimensions to the two-dimensional mode used to control the Hydrofoil.

Prices for the new drone models range between US $99 and $189.

Video by Kristen Clark.

The Conversation (0)

The Bionic-Hand Arms Race

The prosthetics industry is too focused on high-tech limbs that are complicated, costly, and often impractical

12 min read
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A photograph of a young woman with brown eyes and neck length hair dyed rose gold sits at a white table. In one hand she holds a carbon fiber robotic arm and hand. Her other arm ends near her elbow. Her short sleeve shirt has a pattern on it of illustrated hands.

The author, Britt Young, holding her Ottobock bebionic bionic arm.

Gabriela Hasbun. Makeup: Maria Nguyen for MAC cosmetics; Hair: Joan Laqui for Living Proof
DarkGray

In Jules Verne’s 1865 novel From the Earth to the Moon, members of the fictitious Baltimore Gun Club, all disabled Civil War veterans, restlessly search for a new enemy to conquer. They had spent the war innovating new, deadlier weaponry. By the war’s end, with “not quite one arm between four persons, and exactly two legs between six,” these self-taught amputee-weaponsmiths decide to repurpose their skills toward a new projectile: a rocket ship.

The story of the Baltimore Gun Club propelling themselves to the moon is about the extraordinary masculine power of the veteran, who doesn’t simply “overcome” his disability; he derives power and ambition from it. Their “crutches, wooden legs, artificial arms, steel hooks, caoutchouc [rubber] jaws, silver craniums [and] platinum noses” don’t play leading roles in their personalities—they are merely tools on their bodies. These piecemeal men are unlikely crusaders of invention with an even more unlikely mission. And yet who better to design the next great leap in technology than men remade by technology themselves?

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