Optimism for Nanotech Business is the NY Times Angle

Despite a harsh business climate for nanotech, the NY Times manages to find a positive spin

1 min read

Although the New York Times doesn’t devote much ink to the subject of nanotechnology, when they do they manage to cover it they put a pretty positive spin on the subject no matter how dire the circumstance. You might call it “putting a bow on it.”

In this example from the end of 2007 in which the Grey Lady seems to acknowledge that there is an uneasy feeling that we’ve somehow have been cheated by all the hype from about 2000 on, we get a promise that was all going to change real soon when all these start-up companies go public.

Of course, nanotechnology companies going public in the years 2008 and thus far in 2009 has been few and far between. Honestly, I don’t know of one, but if someone knows of any please let me know.

Unfazed by their rosy appraisal of nanotechnology 18 months ago failing to materialize, the NY Times have put their happy face on nanotech once again.

Of course, the paper of record again presents us with the difficult context from which nanotechnology is going to save the world. But nanotech is no longer suffering from unsupported hype, but this time the challenging obstacle is government budget cuts that promise to decimate nanotechnology epicenters like California.

The savior this time comes in the form of university and industry collaborative development agreements. The evolution from IPOs being the rescuer of nanotechnology back to basic university/industry partnerships seems more a regression than a progression. But considering the current state of the market, finding any silver lining to the storm clouds now circling nanotechnology seems welcomed.

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Emily Cooper
Green

Perhaps the most far-reaching technological achievement over the last 50 years has been the steady march toward ever smaller transistors, fitting them more tightly together, and reducing their power consumption. And yet, ever since the two of us started our careers at Intel more than 20 years ago, we’ve been hearing the alarms that the descent into the infinitesimal was about to end. Yet year after year, brilliant new innovations continue to propel the semiconductor industry further.

Along this journey, we engineers had to change the transistor’s architecture as we continued to scale down area and power consumption while boosting performance. The “planar” transistor designs that took us through the last half of the 20th century gave way to 3D fin-shaped devices by the first half of the 2010s. Now, these too have an end date in sight, with a new gate-all-around (GAA) structure rolling into production soon. But we have to look even further ahead because our ability to scale down even this new transistor architecture, which we call RibbonFET, has its limits.

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