OnScale: Driving 5G Innovation

We all want 5G smartphones that can live stream high-definition selfies, 5G augmented reality gear or 5G drones that can broadcast 4K video from anywhere on the planet.

1 min read
OnScale

We all want 5G smartphones that can live stream high-definition selfies, 5G augmented reality gear or 5G drones that can broadcast 4K video from anywhere on the planet. But analysts say 5G devices aren’t coming any time soon. Let’s take a deeper look at why.

For 5G mobile device like smartphones, the challenge engineers face is miniaturizing and optimizing the performance of the radio frequency front end. The RF front-end module consists of filters, amplifiers and switches to manage gigahertz RF signals.

Figure 1

Filters for 5G bands are especially challenging to optimize, and in a 5G smartphone there will be dozens of these tiny filters. In fact, the only way to truly optimize RF filters is by using computer-aided engineering simulation and optimization. And the only CAE platform capable of optimizing next-generation RF filters is OnScale.

Figure 2Full 3D TC-SAW simulation – 50M DoF solved in under 12 hours

OnScale is an extremely powerful, on-demand, scalable cloud CAE platform that breaks performance barriers for engineers optimizing next-generation 5G RF filters.

With OnScale Cloud, engineers can analyze hundreds, thousands, even millions of design concepts rapidly in parallel on thousands of HPCs in the cloud. With this amount of computational power, engineers can explore massive design spaces and find optimal designs quickly, all while slashing R&D cost, risk and time to market.

To learn more about how OnScale is driving 5G Innovation, please visit www.OnScale.com/5G.

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An IBM Quantum Computer Will Soon Pass the 1,000-Qubit Mark

The Condor processor is just one quantum-computing advance slated for 2023

4 min read
This photo shows a woman working on a piece of apparatus that is suspended from the ceiling of the laboratory.

A researcher at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center examines some of the quantum hardware being constructed there.

Connie Zhou/IBM

IBM’s Condor, the world’s first universal quantum computer with more than 1,000 qubits, is set to debut in 2023. The year is also expected to see IBM launch Heron, the first of a new flock of modular quantum processors that the company says may help it produce quantum computers with more than 4,000 qubits by 2025.

This article is part of our special report Top Tech 2023.

While quantum computers can, in theory, quickly find answers to problems that classical computers would take eons to solve, today’s quantum hardware is still short on qubits, limiting its usefulness. Entanglement and other quantum states necessary for quantum computation are infamously fragile, being susceptible to heat and other disturbances, which makes scaling up the number of qubits a huge technical challenge.

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