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New Website for IEEE’s Conference Organizers Provides A Whole Suite of Services

IEEE’s eXpress Conference Publishing group provides peer review, plagiarism screening, collection of final papers and other offerings

2 min read
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THE INSTITUTEIEEE’s eXpress Conference Publishing (IEEE eCP) service recently launched a website to better serve IEEE conference organizers. The in-house publishing group provides assistance with publishing needs for conferences from start to finish. That includes peer review, plagiarism screening, collection of final papers, and final paper submission to the IEEE Xplore Digital Library. The service uses a single platform that integrates all the various tasks into a seamless workflow by simplifying many of the organizational functions handled by the publication’s chair.

From the new mobile-friendly website, organizers can request a quote for publishing a proceedings for any size conference. Included in the publishing guidelines section of the site is a helpful list of the required documentation, such as the mandatory conference application, IEEE’s electronic copyright form, and a brochure about how to protect against cybersecurity threats.

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Atari Breakout: The Best Videogame of All Time?

Breakout—as designed by Steve Wozniak—was a manufacturing nightmare

2 min read
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atari breakout game screen showing a paddle at bottom and rows of colored bricks and two score fields at top
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Breakout was the best video game ever invented, many designers say, because it was the first true video game. Before Breakout, all were games like Pong—imitations of real life. With Breakout, a single paddle was used to direct a ball at a wall of colored bricks. Contact made a brick vanish and the ball change speed. The game could never exist in any medium other than video.

Like Pong, the specifications for Breakout—its look and game rules—were defined by Nolan Bushnell at Atari Inc., Sunnyvale, Calif. But along with the specs came an engineering challenge in 1975: design the game with less than 50 chips, and the designer would receive $700; design the game with less than 40 chips, and the designer would receive $1000. Most games at that time contained over 100 chips. Steven Jobs, now president of Apple Computer, Santa Clara, Calif., was hanging around Atari at that time. “He was dirt poor,” recalled Allan Alcorn, who joined Atari at its formation. Atari’s design offer was “good cash”—to Mr. Jobs. Mr. Alcorn remembered that Mr. Jobs quickly designed the game with fewer than 50 chips. He had help. He called on his friend, Steven Wozniak, who later designed the Apple computer.

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