The October 2022 issue of IEEE Spectrum is here!

Close bar

New Supercomputer Ranking Shows China Still on Top

The TOP500 ranking shows little change in the world's fastest supercomputers

2 min read
Tianhe-2 supercomputer
China's Tianhe-2 remains the world champ.
Photo: AP Images

The TOP500 supercomputer ranking, published today, shows China’s Tianhe-2 supercomputer remaining at the top of the heap, with its 33.86 petaflops/s. The number-two spot also remains unchanged: Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Titan supercomputer, which can run at 17.59 petaflops/s.

Indeed, there is little change in the top 10 positions, with only two new names appearing in that elite group, Trinity (number 6, managed and operated by Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories) and Hazel-Hen (number 8, at Höchstleistungsrechenzentrum Stuttgart). These systems were both installed in 2015, as was Saudi Arabia’s Shaheen II supcomputer, which ranks 9th. The seven other supercomputers in this grouping date from 2013 or earlier.

As you’d expect with such little turn over at the top of the list, the overall rate of growth in performance of the world’s top supercomputers has been slowing in recent years. But the summed performance of the world’s 500 fastest supercomputers is still up by 55 petaflops/s over the TOP500’s June 2015 ranking.

If there’s any take-home message coming through from today’s ranking, it’s the growing dominance of Chinese supercomputers on the world’s stage. China now has 109 supercomputers in the top 500, up from just 37 in July. At the same time, the U.S. share has dropped from 231 to 200. And the European component is also down, from 141 in July to 108 now.

If China ends up using its computing behemoths to significantly advance its industrial prowess, companies in other parts of the world might well worry about the trajectory evidenced in today’s rankings. But that, of course, is a big “if.”

RANKNAMESITERMAX(TFLOPS/S)
Not much change was reported in the world's 10 most powerful supercomputers.
1Tianhe-2National Super Computer Center in Guangzhou
China
33,862.7
2TitanDOE/SC/Oak Ridge National Laboratory
United States
17,590.0
3SequoiaDOE/NNSA/LLNL
United States
17,173.2
4K computerRIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (AICS)
Japan
10,510.0
5MiraDOE/SC/Argonne National Laboratory
United States
8,586.6
6TrinityDOE/NNSA/LANL/SNL
United States
8,100.9
7Piz DaintSwiss National Supercomputing Centre (CSCS)
Switzerland
6,271.0
8Hazel HenHLRS - Höchstleistungsrechenzentrum Stuttgart
Germany
5,640.2
9Shaheen IIKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology
Saudi Arabia
5,537.0
10StampedeTexas Advanced Computing Center/Univ. of Texas United States5,168.1

The Conversation (0)

The Spectacular Collapse of CryptoKitties, the First Big Blockchain Game

A cautionary tale of NFTs, Ethereum, and cryptocurrency security

8 min read
Vertical
Mountains and cresting waves made of cartoon cats and large green coins.
Frank Stockton
Pink

On 4 September 2018, someone known only as Rabono bought an angry cartoon cat named Dragon for 600 ether—an amount of Ethereum cryptocurrency worth about US $170,000 at the time, or $745,000 at the cryptocurrency’s value in July 2022.

It was by far the highest transaction yet for a nonfungible token (NFT), the then-new concept of a unique digital asset. And it was a headline-grabbing opportunity for CryptoKitties, the world’s first blockchain gaming hit. But the sky-high transaction obscured a more difficult truth: CryptoKitties was dying, and it had been for some time.

Keep Reading ↓Show less
{"imageShortcodeIds":[]}