NASA Remakes the Airplane Wing With Electric Propulsion and a Whole Lot of Propellers

Speeding the flow of air over a smaller wing promises more efficient aircraft

10 min read
Photo: Curt Mason/Project Habu
Photo: Curt Mason/Project Habu

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“Quantum-Safe” Crypto Hacked by 10-Year-Old PC

Many challenges still lie ahead for postquantum cryptography

7 min read
A yellow key shape breaking through boxes and lines
Getty Images

Future quantum computers may rapidly break modern cryptography. Now researchers find that a promising algorithm designed to protect computers from these advanced attacks could get broken in just 4 minutes. And the catch is that 4-minute time stamp was not achieved by a cutting-edge machine but by a regular 10-year-old desktop computer. This latest, surprising defeat highlights the many hurdles postquantum cryptography will need to clear before adoption, researchers say.

In theory, quantum computers can quickly solve problems it might take classical computers untold eons to solve. For example, much of modern cryptography relies on the extreme difficulty that classical computers face when it comes to mathematical problems such as factoring huge numbers. However, quantum computers can in principle run algorithms that can rapidly crack such encryption.

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Nuclear Energy Brinkmanship in Ukraine

The Zaporizhzhia power plant is a strategically important prize, but war damage could be calamitous

6 min read
Barbed wire in the foreground frames a power plant in the distance across a wide river.

The Ukrainian-held city of Nikopol has been the target of frequent shelling by Russian invaders from the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant, seen here from Nikopol, across the Dnipro River. Much of the Zaporizhzhia Region has been occupied by Russia since early in the war.

Dmytro Smolyenko/Ukrinform/Future Publishing/Getty Images

A battle of nerves and steel is raging at Europe’s largest nuclear power plant, which Russia captured in March. Russian forces use the Zaporizhzhia plant as a safe haven for troops and equipment, including artillery that is shelling Ukrainian-held territory directly across the Dnipro River. Ukraine is launching a counteroffensive to retake occupied territory, including Zaporizhzhia. And, all the while, each blames the other as explosions rock the nuclear site.

According to a Reuters report today, Russia’s Defense Department may order the plant to shut down, citing shelling damage to the plant’s “back-up support systems.” Yesterday most plant workers were allegedly told not to come to work tomorrow, according to Ukranian intelligence, which warns the Russians may be planning a dangerous “provocation.”

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Take the Lead on Satellite Design Using Digital Engineering

Learn how to accelerate your satellite design process and reduce risk and costs with model-based engineering methods

1 min read
Keysight
Keysight

Win the race to design and deploy satellite technologies and systems. Learn how new digital engineering techniques can accelerate development and reduce your risk and costs. Download this free whitepaper now!

Our white paper covers:

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