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Nanowires for Tougher Touchscreens

New transparent thin film throws its hat in the ring as an indium-tin-oxide replacement

2 min read
Nanowires for Tougher Touchscreens
Photo: University of Akron

Many of us have experienced that sinking feeling after dropping an expensive smart phone on the asphalt and realizing that the screen is shattered.

That heartbreak may be a thing of the past due to research out of the University of Akron: a new transparent electrode material that makes the screen virtually shatterproof.

There has been a huge push in nanomaterial research with the aim of finding a replacement for indium tin oxide (ITO), which is the material from which transparent conductors that control screen pixels are made.

One of the problems with ITO is that it’s a relatively scarce resource, and with the market for tablets and smart phones exploding, that scarcity has become more acute. This market shortage, combined with the brittleness of ITO-based screens, explains why a variety of nanomaterials have been given a “market pull” opportunity rather than merely a “technology push” prayer.

“These two pronounced factors drive the need to substitute ITO with a cost-effective and flexible conductive transparent film,” said Yu Zhu, an assistant professor at the University of Akron, in a press release. “We expect this film to emerge on the market as a true ITO competitor. The annoying problem of cracked smartphone screens may be solved once and for all with this flexible touchscreen.”

Xu and his colleagues published their results in the journal ACS Nano; the paper describes the process they used to create their transparent film.

They started with conductive metal films (copper, in this case) on which they patterned transparent metal nanowire networks with electrospun fibers as a mask. Then, with the metal nanowires, they fabricated transparent electrodes on both rigid glass and polymer (polyethylene terephthalate (PET)) substrates.

The researchers claim that both the transmittance (the amount of light that passes through a material) and the sheet resistance (a measurement of a thin film's resistance to electrical current) of the metal nanowire-based electrodes they have developed are better than ITO-based electrodes.

Two years ago, Samsung made a transparent conductor from graphene, and there are a number of companies already out there—like Cambrios, and Blue Nano, to name a couple—that are marketing silver-nanowire-based transparent electrodes. If this copper-nanowire-based transparent electrode solution is going to be the next ITO, it’s got a lot of competitors fighting for the same role.

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Deep Learning Could Bring the Concert Experience Home

The century-old quest for truly realistic sound production is finally paying off

12 min read
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Image containing multiple aspects such as instruments and left and right open hands.
Stuart Bradford
Blue

Now that recorded sound has become ubiquitous, we hardly think about it. From our smartphones, smart speakers, TVs, radios, disc players, and car sound systems, it’s an enduring and enjoyable presence in our lives. In 2017, a survey by the polling firm Nielsen suggested that some 90 percent of the U.S. population listens to music regularly and that, on average, they do so 32 hours per week.

Behind this free-flowing pleasure are enormous industries applying technology to the long-standing goal of reproducing sound with the greatest possible realism. From Edison’s phonograph and the horn speakers of the 1880s, successive generations of engineers in pursuit of this ideal invented and exploited countless technologies: triode vacuum tubes, dynamic loudspeakers, magnetic phonograph cartridges, solid-state amplifier circuits in scores of different topologies, electrostatic speakers, optical discs, stereo, and surround sound. And over the past five decades, digital technologies, like audio compression and streaming, have transformed the music industry.

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