The December 2022 issue of IEEE Spectrum is here!

Close bar

Nanofilm Serves as Artificial Retina

Greater durability, flexibility and efficiency offer advantages over other artificial retina solutions

2 min read
Nanofilm Serves as Artificial Retina
Image: American Chemical Society

Israel-based Nano Retina made some noise a few years back with its development of so-called “nanoelectrodes” that “interface with the eye’s bipolar neurons” and restart neural stimulation, allowing for messages to go to the brain. The nanoelectrodes served as a kind of artificial retina.

Since then it doesn’t appear that Nano Retina has had much more to report on the development of its implantable device, at least from what its website reveals. But it other Israeli researchers do, in a paper published in the journal Nano Letters. The team from Tel Aviv University, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem Centers for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and Newcastle University combined semiconductor nanorods and carbon nanotubes to create a wireless, light-sensitive, flexible film that could potentially act in the place of a damaged retina.

The researchers used a plasma polymerized acrylic acid midlayer to make covalent bonds with the semiconductor nanorods directly onto neuro-adhesive, three-dimensional carbon nanotube surfaces.

The researchers have tested the device in a chick’s retina that in normal conditions would not have responded to light. These tests demonstrated that the flexible film absorbed light, which then triggered neuronal activity in the chick.

The researchers claim that this film is more durable, flexible and efficient, as well as better able to stimulate neurons, compared to other competitive devices. While there have been a number of approaches to creating artificial retinas to address diseases of the retina, such as macular degeneration, the stumbling block has largely been getting the device to fit inside the eye itself.

This is why solutions such as Nano Retina’s nanoelectrodes have been so attractive. It would seem, based Nano Retina’s reticence since its initial announcement, that the engineering issues are significant even with a nanoscale solution. Whether this latest research can find a way around them remains to be seen.

The Conversation (0)

Are You Ready for Workplace Brain Scanning?

Extracting and using brain data will make workers happier and more productive, backers say

11 min read
Vertical
A photo collage showing a man wearing a eeg headset while looking at a computer screen.
Nadia Radic
DarkGray

Get ready: Neurotechnology is coming to the workplace. Neural sensors are now reliable and affordable enough to support commercial pilot projects that extract productivity-enhancing data from workers’ brains. These projects aren’t confined to specialized workplaces; they’re also happening in offices, factories, farms, and airports. The companies and people behind these neurotech devices are certain that they will improve our lives. But there are serious questions about whether work should be organized around certain functions of the brain, rather than the person as a whole.

To be clear, the kind of neurotech that’s currently available is nowhere close to reading minds. Sensors detect electrical activity across different areas of the brain, and the patterns in that activity can be broadly correlated with different feelings or physiological responses, such as stress, focus, or a reaction to external stimuli. These data can be exploited to make workers more efficient—and, proponents of the technology say, to make them happier. Two of the most interesting innovators in this field are the Israel-based startup InnerEye, which aims to give workers superhuman abilities, and Emotiv, a Silicon Valley neurotech company that’s bringing a brain-tracking wearable to office workers, including those working remotely.

Keep Reading ↓Show less
{"imageShortcodeIds":[]}