Moore’s Law Might Be Slowing Down, But Not Energy Efficiency

Miniaturization may be tough, but there's still room to drive down power consumption in modern computers

4 min read
Moore’s Law Might Be Slowing Down, But Not Energy Efficiency
Illustration: Serge Bloch

opening illustration Moores EfficiencyIllustration: Serge Bloch

No one can say exactly when the era of Moore’s Law will come to a close. Nevertheless, semiconductor experts like us can’t resist speculating about that day because it will mark the end of an extraordinary period of history, with uncertain implications for one of the world’s most important industries.

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Waiting for Superbatteries

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3 min read
A man dressed in black is seen from above at the right-hand side of a white table divided into six rectangles, their longer sides running left and right of the man—that is, up and down, from the reader’s point of view. A narrow arm, framed in orange, extends from left to right down the middle of the table, crossing the rectangles; the man is working on the right-hand side of the arm, which contains electrical apparatus.

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Julian Stratenschulte/picture alliance/Getty Images

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8 min read
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Enel X Way USA

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2 min read

This is a sponsored article brought to you by 321 Gang.

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