The December 2022 issue of IEEE Spectrum is here!

Close bar

Mildred Dresselhaus, the ‘Queen of Carbon Science,’ Has IEEE Medal Named in Her Honor

The late MIT professor paved the way for the rise of nanotechnology

2 min read
Professor Mildred Dresselhaus with an ultra high vacuum surface analysis system for imaging and characterizing thin film organic and inorganic materials and devices in the soft semiconductor lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Photo: Micheline Pelletier/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Images)

Professor Mildred Dresselhaus with an ultra high vacuum surface analysis system for imaging and characterizing thin film organic and inorganic materials and devices in the soft semiconductor lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.Mildred Dresselhaus next to an ultra high vacuum surface analysis system for imaging and characterizing thin film organic and inorganic materials and devices in the soft semiconductor lab at MIT.Photo: Micheline Pelletier/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Images

THE INSTITUTE The new IEEE Mildred Dresselhaus Medal, sponsored by Google, honors the late MIT professor of physics and electrical engineering, who did groundbreaking work on carbon and its thermal and electrical properties. Dresselhaus, an IEEE life Fellow, was known as the ‘Queen of Carbon Science’ for her lifelong research into the properties of graphite and other carbon-based materials.

For her contributions, she received the 2015 IEEE Medal of Honor, becoming the first woman to win the organization’s highest award. The medal is sponsored by the IEEE Foundation.  

She died in 2017 at the age of 86.

ANNUAL MEDAL

The Dresselhaus Medal recognizes outstanding technical contributions in science and engineering of great impact to IEEE fields of interest. The prize consists of a gold medal and its bronze replica, a certificate, and a cash prize.

The deadline for nominations is 15 June.

The annual award is scheduled to be presented for the first time at the 2021 IEEE Honors Ceremony.

DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR

Dresselhaus became a professor of electrical engineering at MIT in 1967, joined the physics department in 1983, and became an institute professor of electrical engineering and physics in 1985. Her discoveries relating to the structure and properties of graphite encouraged research into single-atom-thick graphene, which conducts electricity at high speed. She made important contributions in the late 1970s to understanding the structure of graphite intercalation compounds.

She also contributed to the study of phonons, thermal transport in nanostructures, and the structure of carbon nanotubes. She studied fullerenes and carbon nanotubes in the early 1990s, before those structures were well known.

Throughout her career, she received numerous awards including a 2014 U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom, the government’s highest civilian honor. “Her influence is all around us—in the cars we drive, the energy we generate, the electronic devices that power our lives,” President Obama said at the ceremony.

To learn more about Dresselhaus and her career, you can watch a 2016 IEEE.tvprofile and read the transcript of a 2013 interview conducted by the IEEE History Center.

The Conversation (0)

Get unlimited IEEE Spectrum access

Become an IEEE member and get exclusive access to more stories and resources, including our vast article archive and full PDF downloads
Get access to unlimited IEEE Spectrum content
Network with other technology professionals
Establish a professional profile
Create a group to share and collaborate on projects
Discover IEEE events and activities
Join and participate in discussions

Economics Drives Ray-Gun Resurgence

Laser weapons, cheaper by the shot, should work well against drones and cruise missiles

4 min read
In an artist’s rendering, a truck is shown with five sets of wheels—two sets for the cab, the rest for the trailer—and a box on the top of the trailer, from which a red ray is projected on an angle, upward, ending in the silhouette of an airplane, which is being destroyed

Lockheed Martin's laser packs up to 300 kilowatts—enough to fry a drone or a plane.

Lockheed Martin

The technical challenge of missile defense has been compared with that of hitting a bullet with a bullet. Then there is the still tougher economic challenge of using an expensive interceptor to kill a cheaper target—like hitting a lead bullet with a golden one.

Maybe trouble and money could be saved by shooting down such targets with a laser. Once the system was designed, built, and paid for, the cost per shot would be low. Such considerations led planners at the Pentagon to seek a solution from Lockheed Martin, which has just delivered a 300-kilowatt laser to the U.S. Army. The new weapon combines the output of a large bundle of fiber lasers of varying frequencies to form a single beam of white light. This laser has been undergoing tests in the lab, and it should see its first field trials sometime in 2023. General Atomics, a military contractor in San Diego, is also developing a laser of this power for the Army based on what’s known as the distributed-gain design, which has a single aperture.

Keep Reading ↓Show less