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Microsoft Engineer Shows Off His Automated Home

This Microsoft developer never feels lonely at home, because, as he puts it, "my home is my buddy"

1 min read

Ramaprasanna Chellamuthu, a Microsoft developer in Bangalore, lives alone at home but he never feels lonely. That's because, as he puts it in this entertaining video, "My home is my buddy." As a hobby, Chellamuthu set out to equip his house with a variety of robotics, augmented reality, and speech and image recognition devices. He called the project "buddyHome."

The house wakes him up in the morning and shows his calendar on a computer and projects a TV news show on the wall. An automated stirrer cooks his instant noodles on the stove. When he smiles while watching a cricket game on TV, the house offers to buy tickets, saying: "Can I have your credit card, please?" The house watches him even when he's eating: "You are eating a high fat diet!!" the house says when he's eating pizza. And when he can't get out of bed after the alarm clock goes off, a device holding a cup of water -- you knew this was coming -- pours it on his face.

If Bill Gates ever has problems with his smart home, he knows who to call.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/v/Pv_Zz0OKT5I&hl=en_US&fs=1& expand=1]
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Why Functional Programming Should Be the Future of Software Development

It’s hard to learn, but your code will produce fewer nasty surprises

11 min read
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A plate of spaghetti made from code
Shira Inbar
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You’d expectthe longest and most costly phase in the lifecycle of a software product to be the initial development of the system, when all those great features are first imagined and then created. In fact, the hardest part comes later, during the maintenance phase. That’s when programmers pay the price for the shortcuts they took during development.

So why did they take shortcuts? Maybe they didn’t realize that they were cutting any corners. Only when their code was deployed and exercised by a lot of users did its hidden flaws come to light. And maybe the developers were rushed. Time-to-market pressures would almost guarantee that their software will contain more bugs than it would otherwise.

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