Make Way for Flexible Silicon Chips

We need them because thin, pliable organic semiconductors are too slow to serve in tomorrow’s 3‑D chips

8 min read
Illustration: Bryan Christie Design
Illustration: Bryan Christie Design

Imagine rising from bed to catch an early flight. As you head for the shower, still groggy, a tiny, flexible sensor chip in yesterday’s clothes reminds you that they need to be washed. At breakfast, you check on your flight status and then stream the latest news to a tablet-size flexible display, flipping through pages of text and video. A message from your doctor pops up, reminding you to wear your medical diagnostic patch and pack your medication. As you leave your house, tiny sensors in the carpet and wallpaper put some appliances into standby mode. At the airport, a flexible electronic ticket guides you to the right gate, and a wireless interface between your ticket, your passport, and a retinal scanner gives you immediate clearance.

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Video Friday: Such a Showoff

Your weekly selection of awesome robot videos

2 min read
An animated gif showing a humanoid robot stumble and recover after doing a backflip

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your friends at IEEE Spectrum robotics. We also post a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next few months. Please send us your events for inclusion.

IEEE RO-MAN 2023: 28–31 August 2023, BUSAN, KOREA
RoboCup 2023: 4–10 July 2023, BORDEAUX, FRANCE
CLAWAR 2023: 2–4 October 2023, FLORIANOPOLIS, BRAZIL
RSS 2023: 10–14 July 2023, DAEGU, KOREA
ICRA 2023: 29 May–2 June 2023, LONDON
Robotics Summit & Expo: 10–11 May 2023, BOSTON

Enjoy today’s videos!

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How to Stake Electronic Components Using Adhesives

Staking provides extra mechanical support for various electronic parts

2 min read
Adhesive staking of DIP component on a circuit board using Master Bond EP17HTDA-1.

The main use for adhesive staking is to provide extra mechanical support for electronic components and other parts that may be damaged due to vibration, shock, or handling.

Master Bond

This is a sponsored article brought to you by Master Bond.

Sensitive electronic components and other parts that may be damaged due to vibration, shock, or handling can often benefit from adhesive staking. Staking provides additional mechanical reinforcement to these delicate pieces.

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