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Looming U.S. Battle on Fast Trains

Obama seeks $53 billion, Republicans object

2 min read
Looming U.S. Battle on Fast Trains

In the U.S. budget proposal for the next fiscal year unveiled this week, the Obama administration is seeking $53 billion to promote development of fast train lines like those in Europe and Japan.

"At least two projects—a proposed Tampa-to-Orlando route in Florida and a planned San Francisco-to-Los Angeles route—would allow trains to reach upward of 200 miles per hour, rivaling trains in Europe and Asia," as The Wall Street Journal noted in a report.

Besides generating jobs and pushing the United States to catch up with rivals in a key area of infrastructural technology, greater use of trains has the potential to reduce gasoline consumption, boost energy independence, and cut carbon emissions--all fundamental administration goals.

Republicans in the House of Representatives, where U.S. spending bills have to originate under the Constitution, have made the trains spending proposal a tactical point of attack in efforts to rein in Federal spending, cut the deficit, and strike an alternative strategic approach to promoting economic growth.

As such, the looming battle over train funding is just the opening wedge in what will be a comprehensive attack on the administration's approach to energy and climate policy.

At the level of state government, where Republicans enormously strengthened their position in the November midterm elections, efforts are being made widely to roll back renewable energy portfolio requirements--mandates enacted by more than half the states in the country to have a certain fraction of electricity generated from renewable sources by certain dates.

Perhaps the most important fight will be over the Environmental Protection Agency's plans to regulate greenhouse gas emissions, as the Supreme Court authorized--indeed virtually required--several years ago. In somewhat startling testimony that EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson delivered to a congressional committee, she said that the agency's intentions are consistent with plans already initiated and formulated by former President George W. Bush's environmental chief.

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Chinese Joint Venture Will Begin Mass-Producing an Autonomous Electric Car

With the Robo-01, Baidu and Chinese carmaker Geely aim for a fully self-driving car

4 min read
A black car sits against a white backdrop decorated with Chinese writing. The car’s doors are open, like a butterfly’s wings. Two charging stations are on the car’s left; two men stand on the right.

The Robo-01 autonomous electric car shows off its butterfly doors at a reveal to the media in Beijing, in June 2022.

Tingshu Wang/Reuters/Alamy
Purple

In October, a startup called Jidu Automotive, backed by Chinese AI giant Baidu and Chinese carmaker Geely, officially released an autonomous electric car, the Robo-01 Lunar Edition. In 2023, the car will go on sale.

At roughly US $55,000, the Robo-01 Lunar Edition is a limited edition, cobranded with China’s Lunar Exploration Project. It has two lidars, a 5-millimeter-range radar, 12 ultrasonic sensors, and 12 high-definition cameras. It is the first vehicle to offer on-board, AI-assisted voice recognition, with voice response speeds within 700 milliseconds, thanks to the Qualcomm Snapdragon 8295 chip.

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