Little Screen, Big Document

Reading big documents on little phones is no fun, but help is at hand.

2 min read
Little Screen, Big Document

Yes, you can read through piles of long documents on your little smartphone. It can be a painful experience, however, particularly if you’re trying to do more than read straight through—browsing, skimming, and annotating are particularly tough. But admit it—you’d really like to take all your reading with you on your smartphone or pad computer. So we have good news for you: Help is coming. Here are three things that will soon make reading big documents on small devices a little less painful. (And you can see more here, here and here.)

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University College London

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WIPL-D

Handling various complex simulation scenarios with a single simulation method is a rather challenging task for any software suite. We will show you how our software, based on Method-of-Moments, can analyze several scenarios including complicated and electrically large models (for instance, antenna placement and RCS) using desktop workstations.

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