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LineScout Robot Climbs on Live Power Lines to Inspect Them

The robot has cameras, a thermo-infrared imager, and arms that allow it to overcome obstacles on the line

2 min read
LineScout Robot Climbs on Live Power Lines to Inspect Them


Hydro-Québec's LineScout rolling on a high-voltage line. Image: Hydro-Québec

Canada's Hydro-Québec Research Institute started the LineScout project after the 1998 North American ice storm that led to massive power outages and left millions of people without electricity for several days. The idea was to have a small mobile robot that could be able to roll on high-voltage transmission lines and de-ice them.

The first line scout was a little rover that would hang head down like a sloth and was equipped with claws to break the ice. The new generation, featured in a recent IEEE Spectrum article, is larger and equipped with cameras and a thermo-infrared imager. The remote-controlled robot has been used dozens times to do inspection and maintenance on high-voltage lines (2000 amps, 735 kilovolts). It uses cameras to inspect line conditions and discover irregularities, while also employing a smart navigation system to pinpoint locations in need of attention.

Japanese robotics company HiBot and the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States are also developing power line inspection robots.

Canada's LineScout has arms to maneuver over obstacles such as splices, hardware components, and aircraft warning markers. Unlike with conventional transmission line servicing, the robot can service the lines while they are energized, saving precious company resources, reducing safety risks and downtime.

The robot was recently tested on the BC Hydro transmission lines -- a project that last June received the prestigious Edison Award from the Edison Electric Institute. The video below describes the technology and the tests conducted on Western Canada's rugged terrain.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/v/PEI5LlL0lBM?fs=1&hl=en_US expand=1]

If you want to learn more of about power-line inspecting robots, Hydro-Québec will host the 1st International Conference on Applied Robotics for the Power Industry (CARPI 2010) in October.

Samuel Bouchard is a co-founder of Robotiq in Quebec City.

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The Bionic-Hand Arms Race

The prosthetics industry is too focused on high-tech limbs that are complicated, costly, and often impractical

12 min read
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A photograph of a young woman with brown eyes and neck length hair dyed rose gold sits at a white table. In one hand she holds a carbon fiber robotic arm and hand. Her other arm ends near her elbow. Her short sleeve shirt has a pattern on it of illustrated hands.

The author, Britt Young, holding her Ottobock bebionic bionic arm.

Gabriela Hasbun. Makeup: Maria Nguyen for MAC cosmetics; Hair: Joan Laqui for Living Proof
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In Jules Verne’s 1865 novel From the Earth to the Moon, members of the fictitious Baltimore Gun Club, all disabled Civil War veterans, restlessly search for a new enemy to conquer. They had spent the war innovating new, deadlier weaponry. By the war’s end, with “not quite one arm between four persons, and exactly two legs between six,” these self-taught amputee-weaponsmiths decide to repurpose their skills toward a new projectile: a rocket ship.

The story of the Baltimore Gun Club propelling themselves to the moon is about the extraordinary masculine power of the veteran, who doesn’t simply “overcome” his disability; he derives power and ambition from it. Their “crutches, wooden legs, artificial arms, steel hooks, caoutchouc [rubber] jaws, silver craniums [and] platinum noses” don’t play leading roles in their personalities—they are merely tools on their bodies. These piecemeal men are unlikely crusaders of invention with an even more unlikely mission. And yet who better to design the next great leap in technology than men remade by technology themselves?

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