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LineScout Robot Climbs on Live Power Lines to Inspect Them

The robot has cameras, a thermo-infrared imager, and arms that allow it to overcome obstacles on the line

2 min read
LineScout Robot Climbs on Live Power Lines to Inspect Them


Hydro-Québec's LineScout rolling on a high-voltage line. Image: Hydro-Québec

Canada's Hydro-Québec Research Institute started the LineScout project after the 1998 North American ice storm that led to massive power outages and left millions of people without electricity for several days. The idea was to have a small mobile robot that could be able to roll on high-voltage transmission lines and de-ice them.

The first line scout was a little rover that would hang head down like a sloth and was equipped with claws to break the ice. The new generation, featured in a recent IEEE Spectrum article, is larger and equipped with cameras and a thermo-infrared imager. The remote-controlled robot has been used dozens times to do inspection and maintenance on high-voltage lines (2000 amps, 735 kilovolts). It uses cameras to inspect line conditions and discover irregularities, while also employing a smart navigation system to pinpoint locations in need of attention.

Japanese robotics company HiBot and the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States are also developing power line inspection robots.

Canada's LineScout has arms to maneuver over obstacles such as splices, hardware components, and aircraft warning markers. Unlike with conventional transmission line servicing, the robot can service the lines while they are energized, saving precious company resources, reducing safety risks and downtime.

The robot was recently tested on the BC Hydro transmission lines -- a project that last June received the prestigious Edison Award from the Edison Electric Institute. The video below describes the technology and the tests conducted on Western Canada's rugged terrain.

[youtube //www.youtube.com/v/PEI5LlL0lBM?fs=1&hl=en_US expand=1]

If you want to learn more of about power-line inspecting robots, Hydro-Québec will host the 1st International Conference on Applied Robotics for the Power Industry (CARPI 2010) in October.

Samuel Bouchard is a co-founder of Robotiq in Quebec City.

The Conversation (0)

How Robots Can Help Us Act and Feel Younger

Toyota’s Gill Pratt on enhancing independence in old age

10 min read
An illustration of a woman making a salad with robotic arms around her holding vegetables and other salad ingredients.
Dan Page
Blue

By 2050, the global population aged 65 or more will be nearly double what it is today. The number of people over the age of 80 will triple, approaching half a billion. Supporting an aging population is a worldwide concern, but this demographic shift is especially pronounced in Japan, where more than a third of Japanese will be 65 or older by midcentury.

Toyota Research Institute (TRI), which was established by Toyota Motor Corp. in 2015 to explore autonomous cars, robotics, and “human amplification technologies,” has also been focusing a significant portion of its research on ways to help older people maintain their health, happiness, and independence as long as possible. While an important goal in itself, improving self-sufficiency for the elderly also reduces the amount of support they need from society more broadly. And without technological help, sustaining this population in an effective and dignified manner will grow increasingly difficult—first in Japan, but globally soon after.

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