Leanpath Weighs Waste

A little Oregon company helps institutions monitor food waste

6 min read
Leanpath Weighs Waste
Photo: Dan Saelinger; Stylist: Dominique Baynes; Food Stylist: Carol Ladd

About a third of the food produced for human consumption never gets eaten. That’s a lot wasted—some 1.3 billion metric tons worldwide each year, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations [PDF]. If you could magically eliminate this prodigious loss, you could readily feed the 3 billion or so more people the U.N. expects to be living on the planet when the population peaks.

It seems like a no-brainer. This is a problem that needs to be fixed. But where to start? In developing countries, inefficient harvesting, unrefrigerated storage, and frequent holdups in transportation and distribution leave food rotting in fields and warehouses and on the backs of trucks. In developed countries, efficient harvesting, processing, and distribution systems that include refrigerated warehouses and trucks mean that most food waste can’t be blamed on spoilage, although some farmers choose to leave crops in the field when they think market prices are too low. It’s when food gets into the store, restaurant, or kitchen that the real problems happen—leading to some 222 million metric tons’ worth of food being thrown out each year.

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Graphene Tattoos Measure Blood Pressure Continually

Ultra-lightweight sensors could work for days

3 min read
photo illustration of forearm and hand with graphene tattoos inked on the forearm and a traditional blood-pressure monitor with armband cuff is in the image background

Graphene tattoos placed over the two major arteries in the wrist monitor blood pressure non-stop by measuring impedance of electrical current through tissue.

University of Texas at Austin

Blood pressure measurement hasn’t changed much since the invention of the inflatable cuff-based sphygmomanometer in 1881. People can use the device to give readings a few times a day, but that’s not enough to give a holistic view of cardiovascular health.

New electronic tattoos made of graphene continuously read blood pressure for days. The ultra-thin, light sensors could allow monitoring of a patient’s blood pressure while they go about their daily activities.

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Mojo Vision Puts Its AR Contact Lens Into Its CEO’s Eyes (Literally)

With batteries on board and communicating wirelessly, the augmented reality contact lens reaches a major milestone

6 min read
closeup of eye with contact lens containing electronic components

Mojo Vision CEO Drew Perkins wears one of the company’s augmented reality contact lenses.

Mojo Vision

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“I’ve worn it. It works....and it was the first ever on eye demonstration of a feature complete augmented reality smart contact lens,” reported Perkins in a blog post. “The final technical hurdle to wearing the lens was ensuring that the power and radio communications systems worked without wires. Cutting the cord [proved] that the lens and all major components are fully functional and reduce many of the technical challenges in building a smart contact lens.”

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Get the Coursera Campus Skills Report 2022

Download the report to learn which job skills students need to build high-growth careers

1 min read

Get comprehensive insights into higher education skill trends based on data from 3.8M registered learners on Coursera, and learn clear steps you can take to ensure your institution's engineering curriculum is aligned with the needs of the current and future job market. Download the report now!