KURMET Bipedal Robot Can Hop Over Obstacles

KURMET uses elastic actuators and a fuzzy control system to bounce up and over objects

2 min read
KURMET Bipedal Robot Can Hop Over Obstacles

KURMET biped robot

Bipedal robots, whether they’re human-sized or not, are generally heavy and unstable and (withfewexceptions) don’t lend themselves to dynamic motions like running and jumping. Researchers from Ohio State University and the University of Notre Dame have developed an experimental biped called KURMET that’s specifically designed for controllable, repetitive jumping*:

That big arm thing isn’t being used to aid in the jumping at all, it’s just there to simplify the system a little bit. Theoretically, it would be possible to do all of this research on an untethered fully three-dimensional robot, but for the purposes of figuring out how to make a robot hop in a stable manner, you only really need to focus on whether it’s tipping forward or backward as it jumps. The “fuzzy” term that you see in the video is referring to how KURMET is controlled: The robot learns how to jump through a training process, not by remembering rules, so there isn’t always a precisely pre-defined action that it’s required to take based on given inputs, which is why it’s called a fuzzy control system.

In the future, the researchers hope to apply evolutionary learning strategies to push KURMET’s performance boundaries, which may or may not include doing flips and playing hopscotch.

The researchers—Yiping Liu, Patrick Wensing, David Orin, and James Schmiedeler—describe their work in a paper, “Fuzzy Controlled Hopping in a Biped Robot,” presented yesterday at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), in Shanghai.

* Among the most incredible hopping machines ever created are the robots built by Marc Raibert and his team back when he was an MIT professor and directed the MIT Leg Lab. Raibert went on to co-found Boston Dynamics. Some of hisrobots are now on display at the MIT Museum.

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The Bionic-Hand Arms Race

The prosthetics industry is too focused on high-tech limbs that are complicated, costly, and often impractical

12 min read
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A photograph of a young woman with brown eyes and neck length hair dyed rose gold sits at a white table. In one hand she holds a carbon fiber robotic arm and hand. Her other arm ends near her elbow. Her short sleeve shirt has a pattern on it of illustrated hands.

The author, Britt Young, holding her Ottobock bebionic bionic arm.

Gabriela Hasbun. Makeup: Maria Nguyen for MAC cosmetics; Hair: Joan Laqui for Living Proof
DarkGray

In Jules Verne’s 1865 novel From the Earth to the Moon, members of the fictitious Baltimore Gun Club, all disabled Civil War veterans, restlessly search for a new enemy to conquer. They had spent the war innovating new, deadlier weaponry. By the war’s end, with “not quite one arm between four persons, and exactly two legs between six,” these self-taught amputee-weaponsmiths decide to repurpose their skills toward a new projectile: a rocket ship.

The story of the Baltimore Gun Club propelling themselves to the moon is about the extraordinary masculine power of the veteran, who doesn’t simply “overcome” his disability; he derives power and ambition from it. Their “crutches, wooden legs, artificial arms, steel hooks, caoutchouc [rubber] jaws, silver craniums [and] platinum noses” don’t play leading roles in their personalities—they are merely tools on their bodies. These piecemeal men are unlikely crusaders of invention with an even more unlikely mission. And yet who better to design the next great leap in technology than men remade by technology themselves?

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