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Keeping Cars from Crashing

Adaptive cruise control is here, the first step toward systems that can help cars keep their distance on crowded highways

12 min read
Keeping Cars from Crashing

Every minute, on average, at least one person dies in a crash. If you read this article from start to finish, 30 or more deaths will have occurred across the globe by the time you are done. Auto accidents will also injure at least 10 million people this year, two or three million of them seriously.

All told, the hospital bills, damaged property, and other costs will add up to 1-3 percent of the world's gross domestic product, according to the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. For the United States alone, the tally will amount to roughly US $200 billion. And, of course, the losses that matter most are not even captured by these statistics, because there's no way to put a dollar value on them.

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Twistronic Yarns Harvest Energy From Movement

Novel fabrics could power wearables and potentially harvest energy from oceans

3 min read
Three SEM images show from top, 3 twisted slightly plied yarns, a plied harvester and a twist configuration, colorized to highlight the sections.

Twistrons, made from spun carbon nanotubes (CNTs), convert mechanical movement into electricity. UT Dallas researchers made a new kind of twistron by intertwining three individual strands of spun carbon nanotube fibers to make a single yarn. Their method was similar to the way conventional yarns used in textiles are constructed.

The University of Texas at Dallas

Novel yarns made with carbon nanotubes can generate electricity from mechanical energy better than any other material to date, a new study finds.

The high-tech yarns, known as twistrons, can be sewn into clothes to produce electricity from human motion or deployed in the ocean to harvest energy from waves, researchers say.

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Bosch Powers the Automotive Sector Toward an Electrified Future

The German company has optimized three-phase inverters and their DC link capacitors with a simulation-powered design process

8 min read
Digital art showing a 3D transparent car with the electric engine connected to batteries.

The global transition toward electric cars is getting a boost from industry suppliers like Robert Bosch, which provides electrical components and systems to car manufacturers. The Bosch team optimizes three-phase inverters and their DC link capacitors with a simulation-powered design process, which enables them to identify potentially destructive "hot spots" early in the development cycle.

This sponsored article is brought to you by COMSOL.

Just as tourists in Paris are drawn to the Louvre, visitors to Stuttgart, Germany, also flock to museums displaying the great works of the city. Stuttgart may not boast of Degas or Monet, but its prominent names are perhaps even more famous than Paris’ painters: Mercedes–Benz and Porsche. Each of these iconic automakers maintains a museum in the southwestern German city they call home. Their gleaming galleries feature many historic and influential cars, almost all of them powered by petroleum-fueled internal combustion (IC) engines. Looking ahead, Stuttgart will likely continue to be the heart of the German auto industry, but how long will the IC engine remain the heart of the automobile?

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