Spiders Trap Toyotas

UK’s easyJet reservation system goes down, Florida’s new unemployment claim system has difficult start

2 min read
Spiders Trap Toyotas

IT Hiccups of the Week

The “Apple-like glitches” affecting the Affordable Care Act website and its supporting systems continue to dominate the news, especially with the Obama Administration’s admission over the weekend that the “best and brightest” IT cavalry needs to be called in to rescue it, if that is even possible. The on-going issue will be explored in more depth in the Risk Factor at a later time.  

While it is extremely difficult to turn our eyes away from the slow motion ACA IT train wreck, there were other IT derailments of interest last week as well, including spiders that cause Toyota airbags to unexpectedly deploy (spiders also caused problems with Mazda vehicles a few years ago), another airline reservation system meltdown, this time affecting easyJet in the UK, and Florida’s shaky start to its new unemployment insurance system.

Spiders Like Toyota, But the Feeling Isn’t Mutual

Spiders Force Toyota to Recall 800 000 Cars

Spiders Blocking AC Unit, Force Recall of 870 000 Toyotas

Toyota Recalls 885 000 Vehicles, Spiders Get Part of the Blame

easyJet Suffers European-wide System Failure

easyJet Reservation System Crashes

Technical Issue Hits easyJet Reservation System

easyJet Faces Big Compensation Claim for Reservation System Problems

Florida’s New Unemployment System Bumpy Start

Problems Persist in New Unemployment Claims System

More Phone Lines Opened to Handle Unemployment Claims

Deloitte-Designed Florida Unemployment System Draws Fire

State Downplaying Problems with New Unemployment Claims System

Of Other Interest…

Level 3 Outage Affects East Coast Internet Traffic for 24 Hours

California EDD Refuses to Release Documents on Broken Unemployment Computer System

Long Distance Bus Service in India Hit by Week Long Ticketing Glitch

Software Issue Delays New Park-and-Display Parking Meters in Little Rock, Arkansas

Australian Telecom Optus Refunds A$8.8 Million to 235 000 Customers for 2 Year Billing Error

United Airlines Says It Wasn’t a Glitch and Cancels “Free Tickets” This Time

Photo: iStockphoto

The Conversation (0)

Why Functional Programming Should Be the Future of Software Development

It’s hard to learn, but your code will produce fewer nasty surprises

11 min read
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A plate of spaghetti made from code
Shira Inbar
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You’d expectthe longest and most costly phase in the lifecycle of a software product to be the initial development of the system, when all those great features are first imagined and then created. In fact, the hardest part comes later, during the maintenance phase. That’s when programmers pay the price for the shortcuts they took during development.

So why did they take shortcuts? Maybe they didn’t realize that they were cutting any corners. Only when their code was deployed and exercised by a lot of users did its hidden flaws come to light. And maybe the developers were rushed. Time-to-market pressures would almost guarantee that their software will contain more bugs than it would otherwise.

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