IT Hiccups of the Week

Obama health exchange glitches, state government IT systems travails, Scotland’s health IT system meltdown

1 min read
IT Hiccups of the Week

IT Hiccups of the Week

The format of IT Hiccups of the Week is changing. It will now be more an aggregation of stories of IT-related system troubles from around the Web. This week saw a wide-range of IT snafus and snarls affecting millions of people, starting with the sign-up troubles involving the public health exchanges being created under the U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (pdf) and more issues with U.S state IT projects.

U.S. State IT System Problems Piling Up

California EDD Department Says Backlog Cleared, Many Unemployed Say Not True

Nevada  Blames Feds for Recent New Unemployment System  Woes

Michigan’s New Unemployment Insurance System Stumbles Out of the Gate

Kansas Hospitals Bitterly Complain about State’s New Medicaid System 10 Months after Going Live

Massachusetts Senate Panel to Hold Hearings on Troubled New Unemployment Insurance System

North Carolina Lawmakers to Investigate Poor Medicaid and Food Stamp Systems Rollouts

Scotland’s Largest Health Board Suffers Major System Crash

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde Health Board Says IT System Affecting 11 Hospitals Finally Fixed

 “Unique” Active Directory Glitch Blamed for IT Failure at Scottish Hospitals

Minister Orders Investigation into Scotland NHS Computer Chaos

Of Other Interest…

Bank Error Makes World’s First Multi-Trillionaire

Tesco Pricing Glitch Sells 12-Piece Dinnerware Set for 56p

Weis Markets Charges Customers Credit Cards Multiple Times across Its 165 Stores in 5 States

Chrysler to Fix Software Flaw in 140 000 Pickups and SUVs Worldwide

Telstra in Australia Email Outage Angers Users

France Blames Phone Company “Malfunction” for Wrong August Unemployment Numbers

Photo: iStockphoto

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An IBM Quantum Computer Will Soon Pass the 1,000-Qubit Mark

The Condor processor is just one quantum-computing advance slated for 2023

4 min read
This photo shows a woman working on a piece of apparatus that is suspended from the ceiling of the laboratory.

A researcher at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center examines some of the quantum hardware being constructed there.

Connie Zhou/IBM

IBM’s Condor, the world’s first universal quantum computer with more than 1,000 qubits, is set to debut in 2023. The year is also expected to see IBM launch Heron, the first of a new flock of modular quantum processors that the company says may help it produce quantum computers with more than 4,000 qubits by 2025.

This article is part of our special report Top Tech 2023.

While quantum computers can, in theory, quickly find answers to problems that classical computers would take eons to solve, today’s quantum hardware is still short on qubits, limiting its usefulness. Entanglement and other quantum states necessary for quantum computation are infamously fragile, being susceptible to heat and other disturbances, which makes scaling up the number of qubits a huge technical challenge.

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