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IT Hiccups of the Week

Obama health exchange glitches, state government IT systems travails, Scotland’s health IT system meltdown

1 min read
IT Hiccups of the Week

IT Hiccups of the Week

The format of IT Hiccups of the Week is changing. It will now be more an aggregation of stories of IT-related system troubles from around the Web. This week saw a wide-range of IT snafus and snarls affecting millions of people, starting with the sign-up troubles involving the public health exchanges being created under the U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (pdf) and more issues with U.S state IT projects.

U.S. State IT System Problems Piling Up

California EDD Department Says Backlog Cleared, Many Unemployed Say Not True

Nevada  Blames Feds for Recent New Unemployment System  Woes

Michigan’s New Unemployment Insurance System Stumbles Out of the Gate

Kansas Hospitals Bitterly Complain about State’s New Medicaid System 10 Months after Going Live

Massachusetts Senate Panel to Hold Hearings on Troubled New Unemployment Insurance System

North Carolina Lawmakers to Investigate Poor Medicaid and Food Stamp Systems Rollouts

Scotland’s Largest Health Board Suffers Major System Crash

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde Health Board Says IT System Affecting 11 Hospitals Finally Fixed

 “Unique” Active Directory Glitch Blamed for IT Failure at Scottish Hospitals

Minister Orders Investigation into Scotland NHS Computer Chaos

Of Other Interest…

Bank Error Makes World’s First Multi-Trillionaire

Tesco Pricing Glitch Sells 12-Piece Dinnerware Set for 56p

Weis Markets Charges Customers Credit Cards Multiple Times across Its 165 Stores in 5 States

Chrysler to Fix Software Flaw in 140 000 Pickups and SUVs Worldwide

Telstra in Australia Email Outage Angers Users

France Blames Phone Company “Malfunction” for Wrong August Unemployment Numbers

Photo: iStockphoto

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The Spectacular Collapse of CryptoKitties, the First Big Blockchain Game

A cautionary tale of NFTs, Ethereum, and cryptocurrency security

8 min read
Vertical
Mountains and cresting waves made of cartoon cats and large green coins.
Frank Stockton
Pink

On 4 September 2018, someone known only as Rabono bought an angry cartoon cat named Dragon for 600 ether—an amount of Ethereum cryptocurrency worth about US $170,000 at the time, or $745,000 at the cryptocurrency’s value in July 2022.

It was by far the highest transaction yet for a nonfungible token (NFT), the then-new concept of a unique digital asset. And it was a headline-grabbing opportunity for CryptoKitties, the world’s first blockchain gaming hit. But the sky-high transaction obscured a more difficult truth: CryptoKitties was dying, and it had been for some time.

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