Invasion of the Hardware Snatchers: Cloned Electronics Pollute the Market

Fake hardware could open the door to malicious malware and critical failures

12 min read
Image of chips marching
Photo: The Voorhes; Boards from Hondata

image of chips marchingPhoto: The Voorhes; Boards from Hondata

In February 2014, the FBI charged a Florida man, Marc Heera, with selling a cloned version of the Hondata s300, a plug-in module for the engine computer that reads data from sensors in Honda cars and automatically adjusts the air-fuel mixture, idle speed, and other factors to improve performance. The plug-in also allows users to monitor the engine via Bluetooth and make their own adjustments. The clones certainly looked like the genuine product, but in fact they contained circuit boards that had likely been built in China, according to designs Heera had obtained through reverse engineering. Honda warned that cars using the counterfeits exhibited a number of problems, including random limits on engine rpm and, occasionally, failure to start. Devices that connect to an engine control unit (ECU) present particular safety concerns; researchers have demonstrated that, through ECU access, they could hijack a car’s brakes and steering.

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A Diamond "Blanket" Can Cool the Transistors Needed for 6G

Gallium nitride transistors have struggled to handle the thermal load of high-frequency electronics

4 min read
blue mountain of crystals with an inset of molecules on a pink background
Srabanti Chowdhury/Stanford

High-power radio-frequency electronics are a hot commodity, both figuratively and literally. The transistors needed to amplify 5G and future 6G signals are struggling to handle the thermal load, causing a bottleneck in development. Engineers in the United States and England have teamed up to demonstrate a promising solution—swaddling individual transistors in a blanket of thermally conductive diamond to keep them cool.

“Thermal issues are currently one of the biggest bottlenecks that are plaguing any kind of microelectronics,” says team lead Srabanti Chowdhury, professor of electrical engineering at Stanford University. “We asked ourselves ‘can we perform device cooling at the very material level without paying a penalty in electrical performance?’”

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New Contactless ECG Continuously Monitors the Heart

Millimeter-wave radar device make electrode-less cardiovascular health tech possible

3 min read
Video still of a man lying down. A box shaped device on a pole sits above his body. To the left, a monitor displays ECG readings.

The researchers demonstrated an experimental setup for contactless ECG monitoring using millimeter-wave radar.

University of Science and Technology Of China/IEEE

This article is part of our exclusive IEEE Journal Watch series in partnership with IEEE Xplore.

More than 100 years after the technology was first developed, the electrocardiogram (ECG) remains the gold standard for measuring the electrical activity of the heart. However, an ECG currently requires electrodes to be attached on a person’s skin. Even the latest consumer technologies like the Apple Watch require a user seeking an ECG to touch a finger to the device’s protruding “digital crown,” forming a circuit across the user’s body, thereby enabling electrical signals across the heart to be measured.

However, researchers in China have reported the invention of a novel ECG technology that uses millimeter-wave radar and AI to infer an ECG signal, making the system completely contactless. Should the researchers’ initial promising results bear out, the millimeter-wave tech could inspire new applications based on a reliable and uninterrupted stream of heart health data.

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Learn How Global Configuration Management and IBM CLM Work Together

In this presentation we will build the case for component-based requirements management

2 min read

This is a sponsored article brought to you by 321 Gang.

To fully support Requirements Management (RM) best practices, a tool needs to support traceability, versioning, reuse, and Product Line Engineering (PLE). This is especially true when designing large complex systems or systems that follow standards and regulations. Most modern requirement tools do a decent job of capturing requirements and related metadata. Some tools also support rudimentary mechanisms for baselining and traceability capabilities (“linking” requirements). The earlier versions of IBM DOORS Next supported a rich configurable traceability and even a rudimentary form of reuse. DOORS Next became a complete solution for managing requirements a few years ago when IBM invented and implemented Global Configuration Management (GCM) as part of its Engineering Lifecycle Management (ELM, formerly known as Collaborative Lifecycle Management or simply CLM) suite of integrated tools. On the surface, it seems that GCM just provides versioning capability, but it is so much more than that. GCM arms product/system development organizations with support for advanced requirement reuse, traceability that supports versioning, release management and variant management. It is also possible to manage collections of related Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) and Systems Engineering artifacts in a single configuration.

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