Intellectual Ventures Invents Beam-Steering Metamaterials Antenna

IV and others aim at cheap in-flight broadband

4 min read

30 November 2011—Since 2008, frequent fliers have relished the luxury of on-board Internet connections. Service today relies on a fixed antenna that picks up signals from a nationwide network of cell towers. But that method offers low bandwidth at sometimes ridiculous prices. New antennas based on metamaterials, though, may soon rescue Web-addicted travelers from expensive connections in the air and elsewhere, and a group at the patent-licensing firm Intellectual Ventures (IV) thinks that it can implement the new technology by 2014.

Ideally, airlines would be able to direct dynamic antennas straight up at satellites, which is possible in one of two ways: mechanically, with a gimbal that points a dish antenna to the right part of the sky, or with a phased array, a complicated setup that electronically directs a beam by pulsing individual elements of an array in precise patterns. But mechanical gimbals are not exactly aerodynamic—one example is that massive protuberance on the nose of Predator drones. And the many phase shifters needed for phased arrays make them extremely expensive—about US $1 million a pop.

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How Police Exploited the Capitol Riot’s Digital Records

Forensic technology is powerful, but is it worth the privacy trade-offs?

11 min read
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 Illustration of the silhouette of a person with upraised arm holding a cellphone in front of the U.S. Capitol building. Superimposed on the head is a green matrix, which represents data points used for facial recognition
Gabriel Zimmer
Green

The group of well-dressed young men who gathered on the outskirts of Baltimore on the night of 5 January 2021 hardly looked like extremists. But the next day, prosecutors allege, they would all breach the United States Capitol during the deadly insurrection. Several would loot and destroy media equipment, and one would assault a policeman.

No strangers to protest, the men, members of the America First movement, diligently donned masks to obscure their faces. None boasted of their exploits on social media, and none of their friends or family would come forward to denounce them. But on 5 January, they made one piping hot, family-size mistake: They shared a pizza.

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