Inside the iPad--A Chip from A Design Veteran

The new iPad boasts a brand new chip, most likely from veteran chip designer Dan Dobberpuhl

1 min read
Inside the iPad--A Chip from A Design Veteran

The speculation is over, Steve Jobs just announced the long rumored Apple tablet computer. It's the iPad, and the event is continuing as I write this. For Jobs, it's more about what it can do than how it does it, and that's usually a good thing for consumers. So the event is more about demos than hardware.

But the hardware is interesting. For starters, there's the microprocessor. It's a new one, designed internally at Apple, tagged the 1GHz Apple A4 chip.

Remember Apple's acquisition in 2008 of chip company P.A. Semi, founded by Dan Dobberpuhl, formerly of Digital Equipment Corp.? IEEE Member Dobberpuhl designed the DEC Alpha and Strong-ARM microprocessors, and received the 2003 IEEE Solid-State Circuits Award for his work. Last summer, the rumor mill speculated that Dobberpuhl was running a team of low-power experts to design a chip that would give a cell-phone higher power and longer battery life than its competitors. It looks like instead of a cell phone, Dobberpuhl has been working on the iPad project. If that's the case, given his track record, this is good news for this new product.

Photo: Apple

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The Transistor of 2047: Expert Predictions

What will the device be like on its 100th anniversary?

4 min read
Six men and a woman smiling.

The luminaries who dared predict the future of the transistor for IEEE Spectrum include: [clockwise from left] Gabriel Loh, Sri Samavedam, Sayeef Salahuddin, Richard Schultz, Suman Datta, Tsu-Jae King Liu, and H.-S. Philip Wong.

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The 100th anniversary of the invention of the transistor will happen in 2047. What will transistors be like then? Will they even be the critical computing element they are today? IEEE Spectrum asked experts from around the world for their predictions.

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