Yujin Robot Launches 3D Lidar for Service Robots and Smart Factories

POST COVID-19, Future-Ready Technology and Products for AGVs/AMRs, Service Robots, and Factories

1 min read

Recently Yujin Robot launched a new 3D LiDAR for indoor service robot, AGVs/AMRs and smart factory. The YRL3 series is a line of precise laser sensors for vertical and horizontal scanning to detect environments or objects. The Yujin Robot YRL3 series LiDAR is designed for indoor applications and utilizes an innovative 3D scanning LiDAR for a 270°(Horizontal) x 90°(vertical) dynamic field of view as a single channel. The fundamental principle is based on direct ToF (Time of Flight) and designed to measure distances towards surroundings. YRL3 collect useful data including ranges, angles, intensities and Cartesian coordinates (x,y,z). Real-time vertical right-angle adjustment is possible and supports powerful S/W package for autonomous driving devices.


“In recent years, our product lineup expanded to include models for the Fourth Industrial Revolution," shares the marketing team of Yujin Robot. These models namely are Kobuki, the ROS reference research robot platform used by robotics research labs around the world, the Yujin LiDAR range-finding scanning sensor for LiDAR-based autonomous driving, AMS solution (Autonomous Mobility Solution) for customized autonomous driving. The company continues to push the boundaries of robotics and artificial intelligence, developing game-changing autonomous solutions that give companies around the world an edge over the competition.

imgYUJIN 3D LiDAR, Now Shipping! Indoor 3D LiDAR for AGVs/AMRs, Service Robots, and FactoriesPhoto: Yujin

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The Bionic-Hand Arms Race

The prosthetics industry is too focused on high-tech limbs that are complicated, costly, and often impractical

12 min read
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A photograph of a young woman with brown eyes and neck length hair dyed rose gold sits at a white table. In one hand she holds a carbon fiber robotic arm and hand. Her other arm ends near her elbow. Her short sleeve shirt has a pattern on it of illustrated hands.

The author, Britt Young, holding her Ottobock bebionic bionic arm.

Gabriela Hasbun. Makeup: Maria Nguyen for MAC cosmetics; Hair: Joan Laqui for Living Proof
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In Jules Verne’s 1865 novel From the Earth to the Moon, members of the fictitious Baltimore Gun Club, all disabled Civil War veterans, restlessly search for a new enemy to conquer. They had spent the war innovating new, deadlier weaponry. By the war’s end, with “not quite one arm between four persons, and exactly two legs between six,” these self-taught amputee-weaponsmiths decide to repurpose their skills toward a new projectile: a rocket ship.

The story of the Baltimore Gun Club propelling themselves to the moon is about the extraordinary masculine power of the veteran, who doesn’t simply “overcome” his disability; he derives power and ambition from it. Their “crutches, wooden legs, artificial arms, steel hooks, caoutchouc [rubber] jaws, silver craniums [and] platinum noses” don’t play leading roles in their personalities—they are merely tools on their bodies. These piecemeal men are unlikely crusaders of invention with an even more unlikely mission. And yet who better to design the next great leap in technology than men remade by technology themselves?

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