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IEEE Joins the Maker Movement

DIY tech projects are turning people of all ages and backgrounds into tinkerers

4 min read
Photo: Charles Rubenstein
At the 2016 World Maker Faire, in New York City, IEEE members volunteered at a “Learn to Solder” workshop.
Photo: Charles Rubenstein

THE INSTITUTEElectronic components are now more affordable than ever—expanding possibilities for do-it-yourself projects and perhaps providing the impetus behind a new generation of tinkerers around the globe. Not all new DIYers who are dreaming up ideas for novel devices and bringing them to life have technical backgrounds. In fact, some are not yet in high school.

They can be found working away at so-called makerspaces, typically located in libraries, schools, and community centers. The facilities provide tinkerers with 3D printers, laser cutters, soldering irons, and other tools. Prototypes and finished projects are often displayed at maker events and science competitions.

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The Transistor at 75

The past, present, and future of the modern world’s most important invention

1 min read
A photo of a birthday cake with 75 written on it.
Lisa Sheehan
LightGreen

Seventy-five years is a long time. It’s so long that most of us don’t remember a time before the transistor, and long enough for many engineers to have devoted entire careers to its use and development. In honor of this most important of technological achievements, this issue’s package of articles explores the transistor’s historical journey and potential future.

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