IEEE Day: 10 Easy Steps for Event Planners

Local organizers can take advantage of a kit and other planning resources

1 min read
Group of individuals holding up a 2018 IEEE Day sign.
As part of the 2018 IEEE Day celebrations, members of the IEEE Kyiv Polytechnic Institute Student Branch and the IEEE Ukraine Section visited the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant to learn more about the accident that occurred there in 1986. The site has been open to the public since 2011.
Photo: IEEE

THE INSTITUTEA record number of celebrations are expected to be held on 1 October to mark IEEE Day. It’s the 10th anniversary of IEEE Day, which was established to recognize the American Institute of Electrical Engineers. The organization, one of IEEE’s two predecessor societies, began in 1884, when its first members met in Philadelphia to share technical ideas.

One day has not been enough time for some sections, so this year’s IEEE Day celebrations extend from 28 September to 13 October. More than 1,050 events were held last year.

To assist planners, IEEE has created a helpful kit. Located under the Resources tab on the IEEE Day website, the kit walks you through the planning process in 10 steps. It includes suggested events to hold for groups of different sizes, how to promote them, and other ways to commemorate the day. The kit includes ideas for hackathons, picnics, scavenger hunts, panel discussions, and workshops.

There are contests for the best photos and videos. First-, second-, and third-place winners from IEEE’s organizational units receive monetary prizes. Members may vote for their favorite images.

To help members find your activity, be sure to submit it to the event map.

OTHER RESOURCES

In the Toolkit section of the website are posters, banners, and other promotional materials that can be downloaded. For those who want to distribute T-shirts to their attendees, there’s a downloadable template in a variety of colors.

The section includes coupons for a US $30 discount on new IEEE memberships. The offer, valid from 29 September to 5 October, does not apply to student and graduate student memberships.

The event is almost upon us. If you haven’t started planning, now is the time.

Anand Shah is the communications lead for this year’s IEEE Day.

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