iCandy: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

Food to fuel, tissue regeneration, and Japanese wind power

1 min read
iCandy: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle
Photo: TPG/Getty Images

Photo: RJL Sangosti/The Denver Post/Getty Images
Previously, when students at Colorado State University put their trays on conveyor belts to send their food scraps to the kitchen, the end of the line was actually a landfill, and the result was the potent greenhouse gas methane bubbling up into the atmosphere. Now the school is diverting tons of food waste to local water treatment plants where the methane is trapped by digesters and subsequently used to power the treatment plants.

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From WinZips to Cat GIFs, Jacob Ziv’s Algorithms Have Powered Decades of Compression

The lossless-compression pioneer received the 2021 IEEE Medal of Honor

11 min read
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Photo of Jacob Ziv
Photo: Rami Shlush
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Lossless data compression seems a bit like a magic trick. Its cousin, lossy compression, is easier to comprehend. Lossy algorithms are used to get music into the popular MP3 format and turn a digital image into a standard JPEG file. They do this by selectively removing bits, taking what scientists know about the way we see and hear to determine which bits we'd least miss. But no one can make the case that the resulting file is a perfect replica of the original.

Not so with lossless data compression. Bits do disappear, making the data file dramatically smaller and thus easier to store and transmit. The important difference is that the bits reappear on command. It's as if the bits are rabbits in a magician's act, disappearing and then reappearing from inside a hat at the wave of a wand.

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