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How IBM Got Brainlike Efficiency From the TrueNorth Chip

TrueNorth takes a big step toward using the brain’s architecture to reduce computing’s power consumption

3 min read
How IBM Got Brainlike Efficiency From the TrueNorth Chip
Photo: IBM

Neuromorphic computer chips meant to mimic the neural network architecture of biological brains have generally fallen short of their wetware counterparts in efficiency—a crucial factor that has limited practical applications for such chips. That could be changing. At a power density of just 20 milliwatts per square centimeter, IBM’s new brain-inspired chip comes tantalizingly close to such wetware efficiency. The hope is that it could bring brainlike intelligence to the sensors of smartphones, smart cars, and—if IBM has its way—everything else.

The latest IBM neurosynaptic computer chip, called TrueNorth, consists of 1 million programmable neurons and 256 million programmable synapses conveying signals between the digital neurons. Each of the chip’s 4,096 neurosynaptic cores includes the entire computing package: memory, computation, and communication. Such architecture helps to bypass the bottleneck in traditional von Neumann computing, where program instructions and operation data cannot pass through the same route simultaneously.

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The Spectacular Collapse of CryptoKitties, the First Big Blockchain Game

A cautionary tale of NFTs, Ethereum, and cryptocurrency security

8 min read
Vertical
Mountains and cresting waves made of cartoon cats and large green coins.
Frank Stockton
Pink

On 4 September 2018, someone known only as Rabono bought an angry cartoon cat named Dragon for 600 ether—an amount of Ethereum cryptocurrency worth about US $170,000 at the time, or $745,000 at the cryptocurrency’s value in July 2022.

It was by far the highest transaction yet for a nonfungible token (NFT), the then-new concept of a unique digital asset. And it was a headline-grabbing opportunity for CryptoKitties, the world’s first blockchain gaming hit. But the sky-high transaction obscured a more difficult truth: CryptoKitties was dying, and it had been for some time.

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